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With that much RAM, you don't need any SWAP partition. If you have plenty of disk space then create 1GB SWAP partition. I am sure it will never be used ...
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  1. #11
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    With that much RAM, you don't need any SWAP partition. If you have plenty of disk space then create 1GB SWAP partition. I am sure it will never be used though.

    GRUB is one of the simplest and easy to manage boot loader. You should not worry about GRUB or multibooting. Leave it to the installer.

    Just install distros of your choice and let installer install GRUB in its default location. As nujinini mentioned already, GRUB of last distro will take charge of multibooting automatically. You don't have to do anything special for that. It default in all Linux distros except RedHat based distros like RHEL, Fedora and CentOS.
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  2. #12
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    Ok, so I tried messing around with the server edition. Didn't turn out as well as I had hoped. I seriously need to brush up on my console commands, and it's hard for me to access the internet while my laptop is down. I'll manage though.
    The "fdisk -l" command didn't want to work for me while I was logged into Ubuntu and I'm not sure why. So I booted up Gparted again and did it in the console there. Everything seems to work fine on the GParted live cd version and I managed to type up what it spewed out:

    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x76692ca8
    
    	Device Boot	Start		End	Blocks	Id  System
    /dev/sda1        *          1          2550   20482843+ 83  Linux
    /dev/sda2                2551          2569     152617+ 83  Linux
    /dev/sda3                2570          5119   20482875  83  Linux
    /dev/sda4                5120         60801  447265665   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5                5120          5629    4096543+ 82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda6                5630          8179   20482843+ 83  Linux
    /dev/sda7                8180         10729   20482843+ 83  Linux
    /dev/sda8               10730         35588  199679886  83  Linux
    /dev/sda9               35589         60801  202523391  83  Linux
    Sorry if the formatting is a little off. Notepad isn't exactly spectacular.

    Anyways, now I'm going to try install Server edition again and focus on locating GRUB.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    With that much RAM, you don't need any SWAP partition. If you have plenty of disk space then create 1GB SWAP partition. I am sure it will never be used though.

    GRUB is one of the simplest and easy to manage boot loader. You should not worry about GRUB or multibooting. Leave it to the installer.
    Ok, I will put all my faith in the installer and see what happens.
    Concerning the SWAP partition, I will just leave it atm. 2GB is not really a big loss for me. The HD is 500 so I don't really mind leaving it there.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You must have root privileges to execute fdisk -l command. You can gain root privileges using sudo in Ubuntu.
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Anyways, now I'm going to try install Server edition again and focus on locating GRUB.
    As I mentioned in my last post, there is no need to focus on GRUB location. Anyways, choice is your only. I won't recommend any new to mess around with GRUB at this stage.
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  5. #15
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    Sorry, I posted that before I read your last post. Currently installing Arch atm.
    Actually I tried the fdisk command with sudo as well and it still turned up nothing.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Does it throw any error message? sudo is pre-configured in Ubuntu and should work fine.
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  7. #17
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    Nope, just did nothing.

    Anyways, I installed Arch, that went fine.
    Then I installed 10.04 Server edition. Installation Seemed to go well and I was exited that GRUB recognized Arch as well as Ubuntu. So it worked. However, when I ran Ubuntu server edition, I am just presented with a black screen. Nothing appears and I have to shut it down by holding down the power button.
    No idea why and I tried installing it again with the same result.
    Currently downloading Kubuntu desktop edition. Hopefully the GRUB will still work. Installing Bt4 atm.

  8. #18
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Which Graphics Card do you have? Boot up Ubuntu again and press Alt+Ctrl+F1 at blank screen. Does it switch to command line prompt?
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  9. #19
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    The UL50V uses a NVIDIA GeForce G210M graphical chipset.
    I didn't get to check if ubuntu worked again because the next time I booted it up it came up with an error. But nvm that for now, I'll give an update on my position.

    I've installed Arch, Backtrack 4 and Kubuntu 10.04 desktop in that order.
    Kubuntu is on /dev/sda1
    Arch is on /dev/sda3
    Backtrack is on /dev/sda6

    However I am running into lots of small little problems. Currently, I only have the internet working with Backtrack and I'm currently posting this in the windowsx of Backtrack, so it's already a great help to be able to access the console and internet at the same time.
    The internet error with Kubuntu is that it just doesn't connect. There is no error message or anything, it is just perpetually "preparing to connect" and every minut or so this KDE wallet pops up and asks me for the WEP key.
    Currently, Arch is my favorite. It's taught me the most so far. During the arch install I managed to go into the console, and connect to the internet with iwconfig. The only problem I have is that when I finished the install and rebooted it, it wasn't connected to the internet anymore, and when I tried to connect, it said iwconfig was not a recognised command. ifconfig worked fine, only iwconfig did not work. I searched around on google and found 1 other case similar and the solution was to reinstall or download the wireless tools via a physical connection. I have not done this due to a problem with GRUB after installing Kubuntu.
    I did this all before I installed Kubuntu.
    GRUB recognised all distro's at this point - Ubuntu 10.04 Server, Arch and Backtrack.
    Then I installed Kubuntu desktop. It all went well as far as I could see. I took note that I only chose some partitions to be used. (This step in all installs is still confusing to me)
    It all went well. However, when I booted it up, the Arch option was gone. It also looks like (Looking at the files) that GRUB2 was used also.
    The GRUB partition still has the GRUB files from the Arch install, though I don't think they are being used at all.
    So far, it's been really fun and I've already learnt heaps about how computers actually work behind the scenes. One thing I'm determined to learn about is how to navigate directories effectively. When I noticed that iwconfig was missing in Arch, I decided to try copy it off from one of the other distro's. I noticed, that when trying to access partitions from a particular distro, you can only access partitions that you specified in the installation. I'm not sure why but in every installation, the only partitions I specified where the ones I was installing the distro on, and in kubuntu's case, the 150GB partition as /home. (In the Arch install I also specified the small 150MB partition as /boot) I don't think I fully understand exactly what is happening at this step of the installation.

    Anyways, when I try to access some of the other partitions from console, I get error messages:
    Code:
    root@bt:~# /dev/sda3
    bash: /dev/sda3: Permission denied
    root@bt:~# sudo /dev/sda3
    sudo: /dev/sda3: command not found
    root@bt:~# sudo cd /dev/sda3
    sudo: cd: command not found
    root@bt:~# mount /dev/sda3
    mount: can't find /dev/sda3 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    root@bt:~# sudo mount /dev/sda3
    mount: can't find /dev/sda3 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    root@bt:~# cd /dev/sda3
    bash: cd: /dev/sda3: Not a directory
    When I look in these /etc/fstab files I get what I think is the information for the partitions I chose when I installed the distro.
    This is /dev/fstab of backtrack:
    Code:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
    # /dev/sda6
    UUID=5236eb31-5bc0-4425-80e5-851866e35d60 /               ext3    relatime,errors=remount-ro 0       1
    # /dev/sda5
    UUID=f4959db1-1771-4a8f-8757-23fb8d16c07b none            swap    sw              0       0
    /dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
    /dev/mtab:
    Code:
    /dev/sda6 / ext3 rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro 0 0
    tmpfs /lib/init/rw tmpfs rw,nosuid,mode=0755 0 0
    /proc /proc proc rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    varrun /var/run tmpfs rw,nosuid,mode=0755 0 0
    varlock /var/lock tmpfs rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,mode=1777 0 0
    udev /dev tmpfs rw,mode=0755 0 0
    tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs rw,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    fusectl /sys/fs/fuse/connections fusectl rw,relatime 0 0
    So thats what I'm up to atm. I might try re-installing Arch again, and then Kubuntu and see if the GRUB recognizes Arch. I think I will be going to one of the Linux User Group newbie meetings in a month in my area. They should be a great help. Until then, any help would be appreciated and I will keep mucking around to see if I can get everything working.

    Cheers Strider.

  10. #20
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    I would not expect any of the commands from your last post to work. I'm not sure what you expected from the first two commands? To mount a partition you need to first create a mount point and this is usually done in the /mnt directory. So you could do: sudo mkdir /mnt/sda3

    Then to mount it: sudo mount -t ext4 /dev/sda3 /mnt/sda3

    The errors you get indicate there is no directory sda3 as a sub-directory in /dev/ directory and I would not expect there to be one. You do not have to create mount points in the /mnt directory but it is a pretty standard way of doing it.

    Your Backtrack fstab shows its root partition on sda6 and swap on sda5.

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