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Noticed this in both Ubuntu 10.04 & now Mint 9, both Gnome. I didn't have PCLinuxOS2010 KDE installed long enough to experience it so I don't know if it's a ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! llebcire's Avatar
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    Question Both users unable to share mounted drive?


    Noticed this in both Ubuntu 10.04 & now Mint 9, both Gnome. I didn't have PCLinuxOS2010 KDE installed long enough to experience it so I don't know if it's a property of Linux or part of Gnome.

    I have two users, both myself and my wife, and I noticed that when I mount an internal SATA drive I can only see/access it under the user that mounted it. In order for the other user to see it I need to un-mount the drive. Drive is a 1TB SATA formatted NTFS.

    I can't imagine this is normal and the 2nd drive is shared for pics/data/etc.

    Strange quirk is that my install is on a partitioned primary drive, 320gb, that also has Windows on it so the OS must access the drive in order to boot - both users can see the mounted 215gb Windows NTFS partition simultaneously.

    Is there a setting that needs to be changed or is this normal?

    I'm at work but can certainly provide hardware specs later if needed.

    Thanks!

    -Eric

  2. #2
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    I think you can solve this putting an automount for that disk.
    Check this url http: / / www,ubuntugeek,com /mount-manager-user-friendly-management-of-disks-and-partitions.html for a tool that help in doing it.

    Bye

  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Set default,umask=0 option in mount command.
    Code:
    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g  /dev/<partition>   <mount_point>  -o defaults,umask=0
    Every User will have full access to NTFS Partition. You can add an entry in /etc/fstab file to automount NTFS partition at boot up. You won't have to execute mount command again.
    Code:
    /dev/<partition>  <mount_point>  ntfs-3g  defaults,umask=0  0  0
    In case it doesn't work, post the output of these commands :
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    df -h
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  4. #4
    Just Joined! llebcire's Avatar
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    Thanks linuxaria!

    I will try that in a bit!

    -Eric

  5. #5
    Just Joined! llebcire's Avatar
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    devils casper:

    First two commands gave errors:
    bash: syntax error near unexpected token `<'

    ************************************************** ***************************************

    Output sudo fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xbbc58b91

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 26166 210169856 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda2 26166 38914 102398977 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 26166 38390 98190336 83 Linux
    /dev/sda6 38390 38914 4207616 82 Linux swap / Solaris

    Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x3e1ffe58

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb2 * 2 74076 595000461 5 Extended
    /dev/sdb5 2 74076 595000460 7 HPFS/NTFS

    ************************************************** ****************************************
    df -h

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda5 93G 15G 74G 17% /
    none 1.5G 296K 1.5G 1% /dev
    none 1.5G 308K 1.5G 1% /dev/shm
    none 1.5G 284K 1.5G 1% /var/run
    none 1.5G 0 1.5G 0% /var/lock
    none 1.5G 0 1.5G 0% /lib/init/rw

    ************************************************** ****************************************

    Thanks!

    I also noticed that Mint modified my storage drive sdb during the install that I need to fix - may be the issue. It's a 1TB that I store pics/docs on - not happy the installed messed with it! I remember an old version of Ubuntu did that as well. I typically unplug the drive when installing Ubuntu based distros.

    -Eric

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    You must use casper command lwith proper <label>, i means:

    To mount the NTFS partion on disk 1

    sudo mkdir /mnt/disk1
    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk1 -o defaults,umask=0

    For disk 2
    sudo mkdir /mnt/disk2
    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb5 /mnt/disk2 -o defaults,umask=0

    If this work as you wish, automate these 2 commands editing the file /etc/fstab adding the lines:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk1 ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0
    /dev/sdb5 /mnt/disk2 ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0

  7. #7
    Just Joined! llebcire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxaria View Post
    You must use casper command lwith proper <label>, i means:

    To mount the NTFS partion on disk 1

    sudo mkdir /mnt/disk1
    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk1 -o defaults,umask=0

    For disk 2
    sudo mkdir /mnt/disk2
    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb5 /mnt/disk2 -o defaults,umask=0

    If this work as you wish, automate these 2 commands editing the file /etc/fstab adding the lines:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk1 ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0
    /dev/sdb5 /mnt/disk2 ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0
    Thanks linuxaria!

    I'll try that later tonight.

    It's difficult to get away from Windows when I need to run code in the console in order to perform simple tasks like this. Windows obviously has downfalls but is fairly easy to just install & use. That & I've been running it since 3.11 in 1995...

    I've been playing with Linux for years but have made the decision in the last few months to dump Windows and I realize there is a learning curve - probably why I keep jumping distros! They're all just a little different...

    -Eric

  8. #8
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    Yes, i understand is not so easy in the start

    My sugegstion is to understand every little step you do, for example in this small task you should learn to use the command mount (useful also to mount extranal USB drive, or an iso image on loopback) and the use of the file /etc/fstab (hint man fstab).

    Have fun with linux

  9. #9
    Just Joined! llebcire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linuxaria View Post
    Yes, i understand is not so easy in the start

    My sugegstion is to understand every little step you do, for example in this small task you should learn to use the command mount (useful also to mount extranal USB drive, or an iso image on loopback) and the use of the file /etc/fstab (hint man fstab).

    Have fun with linux
    Linuxaria,

    I certainly appreciate the assistance offered by both yourself and devils casper!

    I started to take on the command line last night and instead decided to swap distros - I still have a fresh install so it isn't very traumatic.

    Am currently running openSUSE 11.3 KDE, and while I initially had the same issue with the drive (actually couldn't see it from either user), it was easily fixed with YaST->Partitioner.

    Thanks!

    -Eric

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