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Hello guys, its my first post. I'm trying to get some insight on how to move forward. I have a bit of a problem. I am just starting out in ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Nov 2010
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    Sharing files on the same machine


    Hello guys, its my first post. I'm trying to get some insight on how to move forward. I have a bit of a problem. I am just starting out in unbuntu and I have no experience working with 2 os on my computer (coming from windows).

    I have a lot of files (music, pictures, movies) in windows, but I want to use them on unbuntu. Is there a way for me to have both os access those files, or better yet, is there a way to send all my files to unbuntu, so I can start deleting all my stuff in windows?

    At the moment, I'm planning to burn all my files to dvds (in windows), then just drop them off in unbuntu, but I'd love it if there was a way which didn't involve me burning tons of dvds...

    Oh yea, and programs too... can I transfer them, or do I need to just reinstall them on unbuntu (like stepmania, guildwars, dvd shrink, kmplayer, etc...).

    Thank you so much for reading my thread, and thanks even more if you respond ^_^

  2. #2
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
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    May 2004
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    Hello and welcome to the forums!

    You can store files on FAT32 or NFTS partitions and then easily share them between Windows and Linux. Doing that is easier than trying to share files stored on Linux partitions with Windows. The thing you have to watch out for with FAT32 is the 4GB file size limit. Not a problem for some users but a big problem for others.
    oz

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Data files are no problem; Linux can read them straight off your Windows partition. But programs are a different matter.

    Windows programs don't run natively under Linux. They can often be run under wine, which provides a Windows-like interface for them, complete with pseudo-registry, but that's a rather clunky solution. In many cases there are native Linux programs that do the same thing and that is the preferred solution. If you can't find a Linux program to do it, you must choose between using wine or dual-booting with Windows. There are plenty of people who use Linux for practically everything but keep Windows on hand for a few things that they can't do in Linux.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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