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Hey there, I've never ever ever used Linux before, but I have heard alot, and done some research as to what it is, and I get the basic principle of ...
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  1. #1
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    Smile Should I switch to Linux?


    Hey there, I've never ever ever used Linux before, but I have heard alot, and done some research as to what it is, and I get the basic principle of it. I'm not computer illiterate, and I know how to work my way aaall around windows just fine. I have a little Samsung netbook, with Windows 7 Starter on it, and frankly, it bugs the hell out of me. I can't change the desktop background, I can't manage alot of the things I want to, and I would like to make the plunge into using Linux, seeing as I don't have much to risk with this. If there's some major piece of information I'm missing, like Linux being resource-hungry, or something that would make it impossible to run on a netbook, please let me know. If not, I would like to get a real proper introduction to the world of Linux, and get to know it well.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    You're not missing anything. I'd say if you are fed up with Windows then try out Linux and see what you think. First thing is to decide on a distro, it's one of the harder things for new users to decide on. Look at some screenshots of KDE and Gnome (the major "look" of the distros), after that you can decide on the distro itself. Ubuntu by default runs Gnome but any linux distro you can install any windows manager (Gnome, KDE, XFCE, Enlightenment, etc...). don't get overwhelmed with the choices. Ubuntu is traditionally one of the distros that new users try, OpenSuse is another.

    Ubuntu has a netbook remix version, some people like it, some people don't. My fiance uses it and thinks it's great on her Dell Mini.

    Deciding on if you want to dual boot or just plunge in is another option that you'll have to consider. It's not a resource hog (Ubuntu can still run on 256 megs of RAM, although 512 is recommended). I'm at 11% right now on 4 gigs of RAM, that's running firefox, thunderbird, empathy chat, skype and a few other programs.
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
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    Alright, that sounds great, and I'll get to it as soon as I can. My major problem is probably my Linux vocabulary though. I'll get to work on it. So, where can I download the Ubuntu netbook remix? Also, is there a way that I can save a copy of that Windows 7 starter, just in case I don't want to take up room on the hard drive for a dual boot, but also want to keep it in case something goes wrong?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    I'm not computer illiterate, and I know how to work my way aaall around windows just fine.Also, is there a way that I can save a copy of that Windows 7 starter, just in case I don't want to take up room on the hard drive for a dual boot, but also want to keep it in case something goes wrong?
    Installing Windows 7 System Recovery into USB Flash Drive | Raymond.CC Blog
    So, where can I download the Ubuntu netbook remix?
    Netbook | Ubuntu

    I would download the Ubuntu 10.04 Long Term Release Version first. You can run as a live Usb using Unetbootin . I'd run it live first to check and make sure wireless works before installing.

    Dual Boot Your Pre-Installed Windows 7 Computer with Ubuntu - How-To Geek

    But first I would make a recovery media of Windows 7 first.
    Backup is good. No Backup is Bad.
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru jmadero's Avatar
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    I've never had a system wireless run immediately out of box (have on friends machines but only non broadcom chipsets). always had to plug in LAN line and then install drivers

    For a comparison between Gnome and KDE check this out:

    KDE and Gnome Comparison

    I'd definitely recommend dual booting at the beginning, try to get comfortable with Linux while having Windows as a back up then you can ditch Windows if you choose to do so (without deleting your linux distro or starting from scratch with it). I dual booted for years before realizing "I only boot into Windows once a year to update my virus protection why am I using 30 gigs for this".
    Bodhi 1.3 & Bodhi 1.4 using E17
    Dell Studio 17, Intel Graphics card, 4 gigs of RAM, E17

    "The beauty in life can only be found by moving past the materialism which defines human nature and into the higher realm of thought and knowledge"

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    No one has really mentioned LiveCDs yet.

    Many Linux distributions, Ubuntu amongst them, provide a LiveCD version of the distribution. A LiveCD allows you to run Linux off of the CD, without making any modifications to the local hard drive. It's a good way to try Linux out without making any commitments.

    I highly suggest trying out a LiveCD and playing around with the commandline and some of the default software that comes with the distro.

    Ubuntu Netbook Remix does provide a LiveCD (and a Live USB option) so that you can try things out with no commitment.

    Enjoy the journey! Linux is a lot of fun.

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    Excellent post cabhan. Live cd's are a wonderful way to get a good feel for linux before you take the dive.

    I say go for it! Once you decide you're ready to install you'll be surprised how many different distributions there are to choose from. I would suggest starting at the shallow end, but if you try one of the more user unfriendly distros, there is plenty of help in the form of documentation, wikis, and of course wonderful forums like linuxforums.org.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    No one has really mentioned LiveCDs yet.
    . Live cd's are a wonderful way to get a good feel for linux before you take the dive.
    . I have a little Samsung netbook
    Having a netbook myself. They don't come with a cdrom drive as far as I know.
    That was why I pointed the OP to backing up to USB Thumb drive or SD Flash and running Live Iso from Thumb drive or SD Flash. If OP has a external USB DVDROM/CDROM drive. Then Live CD is a option.
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    Very true rok. I've personally never tried the thumb drive route. How fast is it compared to cd/dvd in live?

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    A nice small Linux to start with is Puppy. You can put it on a pendrive or even as an image file inside Windows for a really fast boot. It's so small that it runs completely in RAM and it has a very friendly interface.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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