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Hello there, I've been using ubuntu for a few hours. I've tried to install: - GimpShop - Gedit - Emacs - and lastly Java Software for Linux. None of them ...
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    Why doesn't anything get installed properly.


    Hello there,

    I've been using ubuntu for a few hours. I've tried to install:

    - GimpShop
    - Gedit
    - Emacs
    - and lastly Java Software for Linux.

    None of them could be installed without some kind of problem that I have no idea how to fix, which has dented my first impression quite badly. Usually with an error way too advanced for me to grasp. I had none of these problems when I were introduced to Microsoft OSs

    However, I am not ready to give up on Linux! So I registered here.

    I have one questions right now:

    Are you aware of some kind of guide that will help me to make the transition from understanding how to use Windows to Linux less overwhelming with difficulty? Especially with regards to the various methods for installation. Because it is here that I have been troubled with problems.

    Kind regards,
    Marius

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter_thom View Post
    InstallingSoftware
    How to use apt-get
    How to Install Software in Ubuntu - wikiHow
    Installing software in Ubuntu
    Ubuntu Linux: How do I install .deb packages?
    Ubuntu -- Ubuntu Packages Search

    Hope that helps.
    Sounds great from the titles. I will dig in.

    Thanks.M

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  5. #4
    Just Joined! hunter_thom's Avatar
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    Sure thing! Hope they help. There can be a bit of a learning curve when coming to linux but as soon you learn the basics, you will find yourself wondering why you ever used Windows (at least, that's how it was for me).

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    I could be wrong, but these symptoms could also point to a faulty iso?

    I don't know how you installed Ubuntu, but when downloading an ISO, it's always best to check the md5sum on the iso, to ensure that the iso is intact. It is also wise - if you chose to burn it to a cd, as opposed to a flashdrive - to burn at the slowest speed possible, in order to prevent data corruption.

    If everything above checks out for you, then come back here and copy/paste the errors that you're getting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chadfluegge View Post
    I could be wrong, but these symptoms could also point to a faulty iso?

    I don't know how you installed Ubuntu, but when downloading an ISO, it's always best to check the md5sum on the iso, to ensure that the iso is intact. It is also wise - if you chose to burn it to a cd, as opposed to a flashdrive - to burn at the slowest speed possible, in order to prevent data corruption.

    If everything above checks out for you, then come back here and copy/paste the errors that you're getting.
    I was thinkin that too. But I have come to think that the cause is my stupidity, hehe! Thanks anyway man M

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    Just a guess, but a windows user will not know what a repository or snaptic manager is. I think I had to read the forum for a while before stumbling onto the power of snaptic. Perhaps, he is still going to the websites, like in windows, and trying to install from there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by degarb View Post
    Just a guess, but a windows user will not know what a repository or snaptic manager is. I think I had to read the forum for a while before stumbling onto the power of snaptic. Perhaps, he is still going to the websites, like in windows, and trying to install from there.

    Yes, I will go on the emacs website, for example, and download the compressed file. What is the snaptic?

    Thanks.M

  10. #9
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Synaptic is is your system menu, probably under Administration, that is where you need to install all your software from.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post
    Synaptic is is your system menu, probably under Administration, that is where you need to install all your software from.
    You should also register at ubuntuforums dot org. Huge user base that never flamed me, no matter my frustration level. When you get a chance, post for the latest survivor guide pdf and read it. You are probably like me, and will consider a modern OS a POS if you need to read a manual to get running. For Pete's sake, there is a gui and all should be explained by designing the gui, not in manuals. My 1984 dos manual was 6000 pages. My 1999 red hat manual was 1000 pages. This is 2010, 20 pages should get one going, unless the designers are lazy and trying to save coding time. So, I held off on the manual reading, until I got some usefulness up and running on my old family living room laptop machine. ( I still cannot use linux on main machine, because linux lacks voice recognition, text to mp3, autohotkey for linux, printer issue yet to be resolved, and video driver goes narcoleptic randomly which is as bad as win 98 random lockups.)

    In linux, I guess when you write a useful program, you upload it to a maintained repository (ubuntu, debian, fedora) Then, an end user --if he wants a cd ripper, game, tutor, etc.-- just goes to admin>snaptic>search>mark for installation>apply (Check options of snaptic to use restricted and cd) The beauty is that the built in installer checks for dependencies on install and uninstall so your program shouldn't break other programs or the OS, like a program can do in windows. It also make finding (free) software much easier than in windows.

    The only downside, is that the user has no easy (if any?) control of where programs install. So you must make sure your linux partition is large enough (They say 15 gigs, I have one machine with a 6 gig drive, but who knows what is best.) You can move your home to an external drive to save space on your documents and settings via editing the mount point in the fstab; only, your linux probably won't boot if the external drive is moved or fails (a big downside to me).

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