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Originally Posted by sgosnell The partitions inside an extended partition are logical partitions, and never primary. True. They won't be created as such. But the use of logical partitions does ...
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  1. #11
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    The partitions inside an extended partition are logical partitions, and never primary.
    True.
    They won't be created as such.
    But the use of logical partitions does allow for a workaround to the limit of 4 primary partitions.

    *I really don't know how to explain the way I think about it without sounding like a moron
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler View Post
    I can't find a solid explanation of the (missing drive numbers). I could understand if the first primary drive which is the only primary drive used all of the numbers 1-4 but the extended partition gets number 2. Partitions 3 and 4 are unaccounted for.
    Well, that's not so different from the way Windows does it. Why is the first hard drive in Windows called C:\? Because early computers had two floppy drives and they were A:\ and B:\. The letters A and B were reserved for thses drives and couldn't be used for anything else. Later, computers were built with only one floppy drive and that was called A:\ but the hard drive was still C:\. It didn't become B:\. And now most computers don't have a floppy drive at all but Windows still calls the hard drive C:\.
    In the same way, Linux reserves the numbers 1-4 for primary partitions. One of these (and one only) can be an extended partition. It can be any of the four. And an extended partition contains logical disks, which are numbered from 5 upwards.
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  3. #13
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    Smile Thanks for the Replies!

    I think I have the angle I'm approaching this with figured out. It's essential to point out that a Extended Partition has the MBR clout of a Primary because it is stored in the space of the MBR. Also that five and up are reserved for Logical Volumes. If you don't use up to four Primary Partitions the numbers are skipped if they are under five.

    Hard Fast Rules Then:
    If it's in the MBR 1-4 are possible, If not held in the MBR the numbering starts at 5. If under 4 primaries are created the remaining numbers 1-4 are skipped and the sequence resumes at 5.

    All this confusion started because of so called "Manual Partitioners" from Installation Disks. They assume that only one O.S will be installed and your are not partitioning for a multi-booter. If you just use the default or suggested settings you end up with one primary and as many Logical Volumes as you want.

    This has been forked to another thread which I will post soon.

    Thank you again for the Great Replies.
    Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 08-16-2011 at 12:06 AM.

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    oz
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    If needed, you can find more info on the extended boot record here:

    Extended boot record - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    oz

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    I have yet to install any Linux distro that didn't give an option as to where to install, which partition. The "Manual" or "Advanced" options usually give you this. If you have a multi-boot system and are using default installation settings, I expect you would have problems. I'm really not sure what the problem is or what you are referring to when you say "Manual Partitioner"?

  7. #16
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    The Installation Disk's Partitioner is like a Wizard even if you use the custom option which could make more sense in my opinion. When people think "manual" they think for better or for worse but the choice is up to them and not a guided "Automatic" of getting one Primary Partition and 3 Logical Volumes while using the "Manual" Selection. Hence Manual is still guided and also Automated. They should use the Terms "Guided" and Un-guided for example. That's just my own approach to it. I used the "Custom" method and It turned out Automated in a stupid way of One Primary and Three Logical Volumes. For a choice of 4 units they should all have been Primary. The other three could have been flagged as not to boot.

  8. #17
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    The reasoning for that, I think, is to leave as much as possible for new installations. The limit of 4 primary partitions isn't an OS-specific thing, it's a limit for any OS. Using one primary partition and the rest as logical is the conservative and polite way to do it, leaving available primary partitions for any other OS you might want to install, in case they can only be installed on primary partitions, like Windows. Why use up all the available primary partitions for yourself when you don't have to? That's childish and impolite, and not the Linux way of doing things.

  9. #18
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    Cool For the Record I'm not Windows Centered.

    After you make an extended partition you can't make a Primary one any more, no more adding. I have a drive that I'm not using and have been playing around with GParted to see what it will and will not do and It will not create a Primary Partition after you have created an Extended one. Your opportunity to create a Primary is gone at this point.

    Thanks again for the Replies!

  10. #19
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    Just because gparted on your current system won't make a new partition, that doesn't necessarily mean nothing else can.

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