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Hello, I've tried installing fedora which crashes after installing AMD drivers and rebooting. (fails to boot) My pc specs are: intel I5 750 Amd radeon 5770 6gigs of memory So ...
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  1. #1
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    Best linux distro for ATI cards


    Hello,

    I've tried installing fedora which crashes after installing AMD drivers and rebooting. (fails to boot)

    My pc specs are:
    intel I5 750
    Amd radeon 5770
    6gigs of memory

    So what distro would most likely run well on my pc?

  2. #2
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    I'd say Ubunut it's a very cool distro.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! simon's Avatar
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    Hi Reikyrr.

    There isn't a "best distro for ATI cards" because all GNU/Linux distributions use the Linux kernel, and it's this that either will or won't support your graphics card's features. Although various distros ship with different kernel versions, you can always install the latest kernel into any distro: Linux is Linux, so distros just make certain tasks a bit easier or more complex; but whatever's possible in one is possible in another too.

    Having said that, I think allwimb is right: Ubuntu is probably the distro you should try, based on your question (which suggests you need your card to work more or less "automatically" without your having to configure anything). Ubuntu makes a particular effort to have things working "out of the box" for new Linux users, and it usually does a pretty good job of this.

  4. #4
    Linux Newbie reginaldperrin's Avatar
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    I would wonder whether there isn't a hardware problem which is causing the video issues, for example a failing PSU can cause all sorts of problems which may be wrongly ascribed to software, which may be the cae with your system.

    "simon" is correct, the Linux kernel includes many drivers already. You can also get the proprietary drivers from card or chip manufacturers. You may want to look at this. I understand that Ubuntu provides a very easy way by which you can choose which video driver you use.

    It is also possible that your Fedora install disc has some errors which are showing up as video errors upon install. You could certainly go to the Fedora download site, get the md5 checksum to do check on the iso file to see if there are any errors.

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Just Joined! simon's Avatar
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    Actually, that is a good point: the 5770 is such a recent card that the kernel support may not be there yet and you may have to use ATI's proprietary "Catalyst" driver (which you can download freely from ATI's website). This is another reason why you might find all this easier with Ubuntu than Fedora: Fedora are very strict about using only genuine free software, and deliberately don't offer automatic non-free solutions (like the Catalyst ATI drivers). Ubuntu are sloppier with their FOSS policies, preferring free software but happily offering non-free alternatives for users who want them. I'm not sure, but I think recent versions of Ubuntu even offer to download and install the non-free drivers for you. So again, whilst you should be able to get your card working on any distro (including Fedora), Ubuntu are likely to make the process more automatic and so easier for you.

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    Google "ati 5770 linux". The first link is to a Phoronix article that may be helpful.

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    Thanks people for the responses, I was able to set up fedora accordingly. (however it isn't very stable, probably because I am reluctant to update it, however I will do so in the future as soon as I have found a way to backup it.(Since it took me quite some time to set up in the first place))(yes, I like to use "(" and ")" in overly complex manners.)

  8. #8
    Just Joined! simon's Avatar
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    partimage or a similar partition imaging tool is great for backups. partimage is on the "system rescue cd" so you can boot the cd (or usb pendrive) and run partimage to backup/restore entire disk partitions. it can compress them, and only stores the data (not the empty space) so even on a 100GB partition a fresh GNU/Linux install can be backed up into a maybe 4 or 5GB backup file, in about a minute and a half depending on your hardware. it's nice and simple because the entire system is saved/restored so it comes back exactly how it was at the time of backup. of course, you will probably want to backup your documents and email and so on separately (e.g. copy them to a pendrive or whatever) rather than backup a whole partition or set of partitions every day. i used to keep several different operating systems (including GNU/Linux distros and a couple of versions of Windows) as partimage files on my backup disk. It means you can completely replace an entire fully configured OS with another one in less than five minutes.

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