Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Like Tree1Likes
I am a graduate and have an associates degree in computer science and networking & communications. I realize I need to start getting a programming background to help with my ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4

    Windows user going to Ubuntu to experience/learn programming?


    I am a graduate and have an associates degree in computer science and networking & communications. I realize I need to start getting a programming background to help with my overall knowledge of networking and just IT in general.

    Is it really a good option to use a Linux OS to learn programming or would a program like eclipse suffice? Would it be better just to learn the shell and stick with what I know? I have just been recommended to use it and I figure I would ask the best people who would know!

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Hello and Welcome.
    I think with a CS background coupled with networking & communications, you do need to broaden your horizon a little bit and take a shot at Linux. I think it will only increase your understanding of the way things "really" work. I would bet that after installing any distro,, you'll already know more than you did before even if you decide to remove it without even booting it up.

    As for the programming question, I can't answer that because I don't know much about programming myself. Stick around, you'll get some advice soon.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  3. #3
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5,023
    Hello and Welcome!

    Learning Linux, or any new OS, is always a good thing
    A good place to start learning the the shell would be LinuxCommand.org: Learn the Linux command line. Write shell scripts.
    And for a good guide on scripting: Bash scripting Tutorial

    Would it be better just to learn the shell and stick with what I know?
    I'd say go ahead and check out the tools available in Linux.
    You may even learn to use it more efficiently than your current software
    nujinini likes this.
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,574
    While eclipse works fine in Windows systems, you are still limited to the programming languages you can use. If you already have a Windows system and want to learn Linux and more general programming languages (perl, python, c, c++, ruby, java, fortran, ada, et al), then you might consider installing a virtual machine manager such as Oracle's VirtualBox (free for personal use) and running Linux in a virtual machine. Alternatively, you can use Ubuntu's wubi installer on Windows to install a dual-booting environment where Linux uses a virtual disc that is stored in the Windows file system. Either option lets you run Linux along with Windows without reconfiguring your disc drive. The advantage of the virtual machine approach is that you can easily switch between Windows and Linux. The advantage of the Ubuntu wubi installation is that it will run faster as when you boot into Linux, it is the only operating system running. It is also better if your system is memory constrained (less than 3-4GB of RAM).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4
    Thank you so much for the idea!!! I think I shall try that, and thanks again for the welcome if anyone else wants to offer some advice I will listen to that as well

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,574
    FWIW, if you want to use Eclipse, it is supported very well in all Linux distributions, as well as BSD, QNX, and just about any other OS that has a Java environment.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4
    I am sure this question goes along side this and has been asked more than anyone could imagine. what would be the best programming to start with? I have heard Python/Java seems to go well but Ruby/C++

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,574
    It depends upon what your intention is. Python is used extensively for system management/maintenance tools. Java is C++ with training wheels. Ruby is a purely object-oriented language that is becoming quite popular (About Ruby). C++ along with C is used for the most performance and resource/performance sensitive applications, but is more difficult to learn to use well than the scripting languages such as Python and Perl.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  9. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4
    I don't really have an idea ill just pick something and go! I got my virtualbox about up and running with some Ubuntu

  10. #10
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,569
    Python is supposed to be a good starting language with a simple syntax which still allows you to do very real and complex projects. The real trick however, is to learn to program, then to a large degree the language you use becomes less important as they all use the same concepts. That said; over time, try and get to grips with a few languages as they will all solve the same problem in a different way.

    When I say learn to program, I mean learn to visualise a task in a sequence of steps; the best programming tutor I had got us to write down how to make a cup of tea in more and more detail "How do I fill the kettle?", "How do I open the lid?", "Well, you didn't tell me I had to turn off the tap! How do I do that by the way?" and so on. Fun, frustrating and instructive! I also mean understand the core concepts such as looping, and branching, all languages use them and usually only the syntax varies.

    Most importantly, have fun while you're coding.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •