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Hi All, I have queries related to pci device. I am having a pmc card in which i have a pci-local bridge.In local side of pci,cpld and controller device is ...
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  1. #1
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    how Pci Scanning is done


    Hi All,

    I have queries related to pci device. I am having a pmc card in which i have a pci-local bridge.In local side of pci,cpld and controller device is connected.

    while u-boot loads, pci automatically allocates the address to pci-local bridge and also to controller which is connected locally to bus.

    I am sure its because of auto config i am getting address, but i want to know how exactly pci scan the bus and fetch the device details and allocate address to it.

  2. #2
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    PCI Bus scan

    Try this command

    Code:
    lspci -vvv
    or 
    lspci -v
    I think that will do it for you.

    If not, let me know.

    Tdsan

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdsan View Post
    Try this command

    Code:
    lspci -vvv
    or 
    lspci -v
    I think that will do it for you.

    If not, let me know.

    Tdsan
    I think he/she was asking how the system scans the bus for PCI addresses. AFAIK, this is buried deep in the kernel when the system starts up, and is intimately connected with the BIOS boot code. IE, I'm clueless! My suggestion is to look at how the kernel works on boot up to determine exactly how. Most of the universe (myself included) don't need to know this stuff, even when we are writing kernel drivers. We can "safely" assume that by the time our code is called, the system already knows about what hardware is available.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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