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Hey guys. Sorry for the question, you must get it a lot. I've only used Linux a little. I'm considering Slackware for my desktop, but maybe I should go with ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Which Distro is right for me?


    Hey guys. Sorry for the question, you must get it a lot.
    I've only used Linux a little. I'm considering Slackware for my desktop, but maybe I should go with Debian?
    I am more happy with stable software than new, beta stuff. Customization is very important to me, which is why I considered Arch, but it's supposedly got some stability issues.
    I like games, but just basic 2d shooters and stuff, nothing fancy.
    I don't want to go near Ubuntu- a bit too "rigid" for me- or Mint, just because I don't like it. It has to be free. I'd like to learn about Linux in the process, which is why I've considered Slackware... does my limited experience actually matter? Unfortunately, it seems that all online quizzes give me results i'm not interested in. Mandriva/Mageia are just a bit too user friendly, Fedora and Suse are too business-like. I've heard about Gentoo, apparently the community is great... but it's supposedly the least user-friendly of the lot. It takes days to install- does that mean leaving the computer on for days, or sitting at it all day?
    I'm really considering Slackware, but Debian's got so many programs... Basically, I'd like to get my hands dirty and learn something, stability matters but i'd still like tons of customization and being able to do simple tasks without too much hassle.
    Please help me out, guys!

  2. #2
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by sramsay12 View Post
    I'm considering Slackware for my desktop, but maybe I should go with Debian?
    I am more happy with stable software than new, beta stuff. Customization is very important to me, which is why I considered Arch, but it's supposedly got some stability issues.
    Hello and welcome!

    It's not like you'd be stuck with whatever you choose to try, and you won't really know for sure which one(s) you do and don't like until you have actually tried them for yourself. For those reasons, I'd recommend trying the one you'd most want to try first, then move on to another distro each time you've decided that you want something different. In the end, only you can determine which distro is right for you.

    As for Arch, I've been using it for going on 7 years and have never found it to have stability issues, although there are some users that seem like they might be a bit unstable at times.

    Good luck... hope that you are able to find the distro that's perfect for you!
    oz

  3. #3
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    ozar is right. We could go on for hours about how great our distro is, but what matters is what you think of it and get out of it. I would also add; consider using Live versions of distros before you commit. That way, you can go thru a few of them and evaluate them without the hassle of actually installing them. Just remember that performance will almost always be better with an installed system versus a live one.

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    Smile Advice : Opensuse

    Hello, I wish someone had answered this question straight when I started withe linux and with computing as you look to be doing.
    I have tried a lot of distros for desktop ( Debian, Ubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora and Opensuse). You must understand what a distribution means first so that you can understand what are the real differences between them. Don't let the impressions of people discourage you of trying.
    My personal advice is th (for me) closest distribution to Windows N quality and stability. That you should try Opensuse DVD installation and you are going to see they offer the best tools for enterprise administrators and for end users that comes from Windows and are used to have a "Control panel" that can really let us configure all the system from the GUI at the same time that it shows to us the text result file.
    I used to hear a lot of bad thoughts about Opensuse/SUSE because they are sponsored by NOVEL but nowadays 3 years of intense professional and private experience with GNU/Linux I understand that only with structured development behind a distribution that it can rival one day to windows.

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    Thanks for your help, guys!
    I've decided I'll go with Slackware for a while, and then I'll try out Gentoo, Debian and maybe Arch. I'm hesitant to say Arch, so I hope if i Slack for a while I'll learn enough to fix Arch if anything does happen.
    Thanks again!

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    Best distro for a beginner who wants to learn?

    Hi guys. I've changed my mind about starting with Slackware. I think i'd rather have a distro that's user friendly and good for learning at the same time. I've decided that I'll eventually either use Arch, Gentoo or Slack, but what's best for now?
    I'm not going to be sticking with the distro for more than a few months, so should I maybe go for a distro like Knoppix, Puppy or Slitaz? My computer's 64-bit and only a year old by the way. Desktop.
    i've considered Ubuntu for the first time in a while. I also looked into Mint, but it might have a bit too much hand-holding features. If I do go for Ubuntu I might go for Xubuntu instead- I like speed. Maybe it's not xfce i'm looking for, i don't know the systems quite well, but I like the Mac OSX-like look. Gnome's alright though.
    Considering either Xubuntu, Ubuntu or Puppy right now.

  8. #7
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by sramsay12 View Post
    I've decided that I'll eventually either use Arch, Gentoo or Slack, but what's best for now?
    Check the link in my signature for some quizzes that might help you to pick a distro or two to get started with. Try them one by one, and if the first one recommended doesn't suit you, move on to another recommendation until you decide which is the best distro for you. The same process can be used with any recommendations that you might receive in this thread.
    oz

  9. #8
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    Considering either Puppy right now
    Puppy Linux does not need installing if you so wish

    How NOT to install Puppy

    You can use your live cd or usb to boot and Puppy will find your save file and load into ram so you can run from ram and eject cd.

    For 64 bit newer gear. I might suggest on of these Puplets releases. I run Lighthouse and it is well polished and full featured distro.

    PuppyLinux: Puppy64bit

    Like I said. No need to install Puppy to internal Hardrive. Just the save file that keeps your changes can go on internal hardrive. It requires a external CD or USB to boot it though.

  10. #9
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    Hi, thanks for all your advice. I've found the distro of my dreams and i'm running it on a VM- Bodhi. It's beautiful, easy to install and very customizable, basically Arch for beginners! I'll give Mint a go sometime soon, but I love Bodhi a lot!

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