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Hiya, I'm looking to set up a development server for an online video game, and we need to decide on an OS to run. The main choices currently are Win ...
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  1. #1
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    Oracle Linux?


    Hiya,

    I'm looking to set up a development server for an online video game, and we need to decide on an OS to run.

    The main choices currently are Win Server 2008, Solaris, RHEL and Oracle Linux.

    Would anyone recommend one of these over the others? Oracle Linux looks promising, but there seems to be little information about it. Speed and security are important, but easy administration by developers is something I need to consider!

    Unfortunately I only have experience with Windows Server and SuSE Linux.

    The server will also need to run MySQL alongside our application software. The development box is an 8 core machine with 16Gb RAM - eventually it'll be scaled out but for now, it all has to go on one machine.

    Thanks for any advice!
    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Oracle Linux is derived from RedHat Enterprise; I doubt that you'd notice all that much difference between them. There is a new version of Solaris available right now, but if this is going onto x86 or x64 hardware, then why would you go down the Solaris route - you'd want to get yourself a Sun/Oracle server wouldn't you?

    If you don't need the support then there are alternatives based on RedHat, the big players here are Scientific Linux and CentOS, both are binary-compatible with RHEL.

    Is there any reason why you've not got SuSE on your list? It's not my first choice as a server OS, but its YAST tool might help you provide config options to your developers more easily.

    On the Windows v Linux (and 'v Solaris', too) concerns here, if you're releasing a video game server hardware that you own and control yourselves, then it might be the best move to pick up an Open Source platform. If you suffer problems making it run right, if you encounter problems under the hood of the server platform (and the likelihood of finding such problems is about the same for all the platforms) you can investigate and fix it on an open source server - you can't do that in the closed source world and you're at the mercy of the company providing the server platform. You'd be pinning your entire project on this platform (and, perhaps, your company too).
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    You don't say why OEL looks promising, so it's hard to evaluate that remark. I have worked with both OEL and Red Hat/Centos extensively, and have seen little practical difference. If you're running Oracle RAC, there's stuff bundled into OEL that you'd have to download from Oracle and install, so there's a minor OEL advantage for that environment. I personally have a strong bias for Red Hat (and CentOS for personal use) because of long experience with them, and because my shop has an enterprise support agreement with Red Hat.

  4. #4
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    We have a mixed RHEL and OEL environment. Mostly use OEL with Oracle RAC servers. As stated above we like how some of the required Oracle packages are already included with OEL. Also like the support cost!

    But here is something we recently ran into. Needed to install a package from Red Hat's EPEL repository. The package installed just fine on our RHEL boxes, but will not even connect to that repository in our OEL environment. Everything looks fine in /etc/yum.repos.d directory (same .repo files).

    So we asked Oracle support for help and they won't even look at it since EPEL is not their repository. Basically makes us not want to use OEL. The sales team says it should connect just fine since they are binary compatible with RHEL, but the technical team doesn't want to help.

    Just something we are going through and to consider. Your mileage may vary.

  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Grendel's post is interesting. I've not tried to use EPEL on any original OEL systems, but I have a few platforms that were originally Red Hat 5 and were converted to Oracle ULN support channels. Those happily continue to connect to EPEL.

    Curious: does yum just behave as though the EPEL repo is not enabled, or does it report a failure to connect?

    I just worked out last week how to revert the ULN'ed Red Hats back to Red Hat support. After replacing the Oracle up2date packages, rhn_register reported "No entitlements available" even though we have an enterprise support contract. Red Hat support declined to help, but grudgingly agreed to file a bug against the erroneous error message, are going to replace it with something that says something like "Not recognized as a Red Hat system, cannot be entitled". I figured it out, but my notes are at work. Can post up the roadmap if anyone needs it, but the risk is your own.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Online game? Go with an RHEL clone, which OEL is just one. There are also CentOS and SL (Scientific Linux) in that category. No licensing fees, and full support for any RHEL environment. Myself, I am running SL 6.0 (workstation) and 6.1 (laptop) and am very happy with it. The nice thing about SL is that it reflects our tax dollars at work since it is maintained by some of the largest physics research labs in the world (Fermi Lab in Illinois and CERN in Switzerland), used by many/most of the most prestigious scientific laboratories in the world. Free, accessible, and stable. Go to: Scientific Linux - Welcome to Scientific Linux (SL)

    FWIW, epel is one of the supported repositories of SL.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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