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Installed Samba 3.5.11 in Ubuntu 11.10. Can't open Samba. Is there a list of files and their default locations available? For example, I have four locations for smb.conf. Don't know ...
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  1. #1
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    Samba file locations


    Installed Samba 3.5.11 in Ubuntu 11.10. Can't open Samba. Is there a list of files and their default locations available? For example, I have four locations for smb.conf. Don't know which one the startup button is trying to access.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Are you trying to run a Samba server on your Ubuntu system, or just use it to access files elsewhere?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I am trying to access files on an unRAID server. The Windows7 network is running on a second pc. The Windows box can see the files, but my linux cannot.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. Then, if I understand what you are saying, you are trying to access files on a RAID network device that supports SMB protocols from your Linux system, correct? If so, then you don't need to do anything on your linux system except to install the cifs-utils package (probably installed with the operating system by default) which will allow you to mount shares on the RAID server. First, you need to create a mount point on your linux system, such as (as root or sudo)
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/dirname
    where dirname is a directory name of your choice. Next, mount the remote file system:
    Code:
    mount -t cifs share-dir mount-point -o user=username,password=password,uid=linuxowner,gid=linuxgroup
    Note that "share-dir" is in the format of //ipaddress/sharedir, "mount-point" is the directory you created such as "/mnt/userdir", "username" is the username the RAID device knows, "password" is the user password for the RAID device, and the uid and gid fields are optional, but allow you to specify what user and group will control the files found in the mounted file system from your linux system. In any case, you should study the documentation for the mount and mount.cifs commands for more information on what you can or should do.

    Finally, you can put the mount in your /etc/fstab file if you want this share to be mounted when your Linux system starts up.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Samba File Locations

    Rubberman,

    I originally used Samba because I thought I wanted to link all three computers - my linux laptop, a windows7 pc, and an unRAID server. All this was working for me under Ubuntu 11.04. When I upgraded to 11.10, the network crashed and I tried all sorts of changes to bring it back up. If I understand your reply correctly, your strategy will connect my laptop to the server and leave the windows pc out of the loop. This can work for me. When confused, simplicity is a good place to start.

    I used the mkdir command and created a new directory (mount-point). I then ran the following command. The terminal hangs with no info returned.

    share-dir = //192.168.1.3/UNRAID
    mount-point = /mnt/unraid
    username = loren
    password = Chhs1959

    sudo mount -t cifs //192.168.1.3/UNRAID /mnt/unraid -o user=loren,password=Chhs1959

    Question 1 - Did I type the command correctly?
    Question 2 - The IP address is that of the unRAID server. Is that what is required?
    Question 3 - Samba is still installed. Should I remove it?

    Truly appreciate your help. Loren41

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You only need Samba if you want to allow Windows users to store/access data on your Linux system. Otherwise, you can easily use CIFS mounts to access Windows shares.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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