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Question 1) I am using unetbootin , take iso image of linux distros and making live usb bootable os from them. I am wondering why the usb or partition on ...
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  1. #1
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    2 questions that are bugging me.


    Question 1)
    I am using unetbootin , take iso image of linux distros and making live usb bootable os from them.
    I am wondering why the usb or partition on the usb must be fat and cann't be ext2,3,4 , ntfs , or other filesystems?
    It only makes my usb bootable if it is formatted as fat?
    I know the filesystem doesn't matter to grub because grub supports them all.

    Is the squash.fs / compressed linux filesystem that unetbootin makes from the iso only in fat? ( I am thinking this is the only reason why)
    Because when I format the usb with another filesystem like ext3 or 4 the unetbootin doesn't even list it in the usb devices as a drive?

    Question 2)
    I am wondering is their away on ubuntu or other distro's that would allow you to boot to a console and not the x11 gui at startup. ( i.e set some configuration file so that init doesn't start the x11 session / desktop but just a black console login screen by default?

  2. #2
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    1) I'm guessing b/c Unetbootin uses syslinux and syslinux wants FAT.

    2) Yes, many ways to do this. A quick way to test is by passing the runlevel as a kernel parameter (assuming your distro is using SysVInit), i.e. at the grub prompt, add simply:

    Code:
     1
    to the end of the kernel line (that is the number one, not a lower case L). That will boot you into single-user mode. A 3 will boot you into multi-user, non-graphical mode. And runlevel 5 is multi-user graphical mode. You used to put this runlevel in /etc/inittab, but some systems are now using systemd and that uses a completely new convention for specifying runlevels. Still what you want is totally doable.

  3. #3
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    Thank you
    I see that unetbootin has that fat restriction because of syslinux. All set with that one.

    The other question I have
    Was running multiple xsessions . i.e being able to do ctrl+alt+f7-12 with 6 different desktop environments running.
    One for gnome, one for kde ,....etc

    But when I try startx or xinit or anything else I get something like
    Code:
    Fatal server error:
    Server is already active for display 0
    	If this server is no longer running, remove /tmp/.X0-lock
    	and start again.
    
    
    Please consult the The X.Org Foundation support 
    	 at http://wiki.x.org
     for help. 
    
     ddxSigGiveUp: Closing log
    even when I do xinit --display0:2

    Maybe I am not doing something correct

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  5. #4
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    I think the syntax would be:

    Code:
    startx -- :1
    assuming the initial X server is on 0.

  6. #5
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    excellent thanks just what I needed
    Last edited by sam111; 11-23-2011 at 06:17 AM.

  7. #6
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    Just FYI, here... If you ever want to change the default runlevels for Debian or Ubuntu, you can setup an /etc/inittab, and the system will pick it up from there.
    Otherwise, take a look in /etc/init/rc-sysinit.conf and look for the env DEFAULT_RUNLEVEL setting.
    Jay

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