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Hi, i am total noob in linux. I am searching for linux distro with 1000hz compiled kernel or step by step guide how to recompile kernel in 1000hz for linux ...
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  1. #1
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    Distro with 1000hz kernel


    Hi, i am total noob in linux. I am searching for linux distro with 1000hz compiled kernel or step by step guide how to recompile kernel in 1000hz for linux retarted users like me. All i want to do is run Counter Strike server on it. Thanks for help, guides.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    1000Hz == 1MHz...

    Are you sure you have a processor this slow? You don't mean 1GHz do you? My first 80386 computer ran at something like 33MHz, that'd be in the late 1990's. In fact I think the Atari ST I had in the early 90's ran at 16MHz. Or 12. Summat like that.

    If you mean 1GHz, then any of the current distributions will do you - just make sure you've got the x86 version, rather than the 64 bit version. The speed of the final system would be linked to how much stuff you put on there above what's needed for your CSServer.
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    It's even worse ...
    1000Hz == 1kHz == 0,001MHz
    My clock has a faster cpu *gg*

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zombykillah View Post
    It's even worse ...
    1000Hz == 1kHz == 0,001MHz
    My clock has a faster cpu *gg*
    Dohh you're right. I think the Casio wristwatch I wore in 1987 was faster than that.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    @Roxoff:

    The OP is referring to the kernel timer interrupt frequency (tick rate), not the clock speed of any CPU.


    @sanj:

    Slackware uses a 1000Hz timer in it's kernels. I think Debian's kernels are set quite low (I seem to remember 200Hz, but not sure). What you set it to, depends on what you want to do with your system.

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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by caravel View Post
    @Roxoff:

    The OP is referring to the kernel timer interrupt frequency (tick rate), not the clock speed of any CPU.


    @sanj:

    Slackware uses a 1000Hz timer in it's kernels. I think Debian's kernels are set quite low (I seem to remember 200Hz, but not sure). What you set it to, depends on what you want to do with your system.
    This is an aspect of linux I was totally unaware of, could you explain in a little more detail? What is the practical difference between slack at 1000hz and debian at 200hz?
    Registered Linux user #526930

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    From Ubuntu Server: Kernel Configuration Considerations

    The server kernel is set to a timer interrupt rate of 100 Hz (CONFIG_HZ=100, CONFIG_HZ_100=y), which means it accepts 100 interrupts per second. Another way to think of this is the kernel looks up and peers around 100 times per second for something to do. The desktop kernel is set to 250 Hz lower numbers equal lower overhead and higher latency; higher numbers equal higher overhead and lower latency. Higher numbers generally mean the system feels more responsive, at the price of higher CPU usage. Some processes require more interrupts; for example, video processing and VoIP servers need 1000 Hz. If you need to change the Hz value it requires a kernel re-compile.
    Debian's kernel is set at 250 Hz, a stable midpoint for both servers and desktops. The /boot directory on a Debian system has a config- file showing which kernel flags are used. The Liquorix kernel, a customized Debian kernel for desktop use, is set at 1000 Hz. A couple of years ago I recompiled a stock kernel to 1000 Hz to see if there was any difference. I didn't notice any increased responsiveness in how I use the system, but I understand gamers prefer the 1000 Hz setting.

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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    Thanks for the explanation.
    Registered Linux user #526930

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Poking through the /boot/config-2.6.18-<...>.el5.centos.plus for my server, this is set to 1000, and I'm running CentOS 5.x/32 bit on that server. I find that interesting considering that CentOS is usually a server OS.

    This value is also set for my Fedora 15 64 bit desktop PC, and my 32 bit Fedora 16 netbook.

    If you want to check your own install, the config should be in your /boot directory somewhere - the value is CONFIG_HZ.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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