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Therefore I'm thinking of going with Antix Here is my how to I made for my eeepc 900 install. Just go with the AntiX 12 testing though. Newer kernel in ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Therefore I'm thinking of going with Antix
    Here is my how to I made for my eeepc 900 install. Just go with the AntiX 12 testing though. Newer kernel in it.

    antiX-forum - View topic - AntiX 11 EEEPC 900 Install (Finished)

    Antix 12 full iso. Comes out to 2 gig install on ssd.

    antiX-486.iso 2012-05-26 698.4 MB

    AntiX Base iso. Smaller install. You will use ceni to connect to internet with it. Use a hardline before wireless if unfamiliar with ceni so you can apt-get update && apt-get install wicd-gtk

    Code:
    $ apt-cache policy wicd-gtk
    wicd-gtk:
      Installed: 1.7.2.4-2
      Candidate: 1.7.2.4-2
      Version table:
     *** 1.7.2.4-2 0
            901 http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing/main i386 Packages
            100 /var/lib/dpkg/status
    Because wicd is easier to use than ceni for new users and uses a gui interface to connect to wireless. My How to on the 900 shows wicd in action and how to find wlan0 to type into wicd wireless preference.

    antiX-base-486.iso 2012-05-26 362.8 MB

    Core Iso

    antiX-core-libre-486.iso 2012-05-26 134.2 MB

    Is basically like a Debian Net install with a few more tools. No X window though till you install whatever Desktop you wish (icewm,rox,fluxbox,xfce)

    Good instructions for a xfce core antiX install by my bro Brian M.
    Brian Masinick Blog: Creating your very own antiX core system from scratch

    antiX-Linux - Browse /Testing at SourceForge.net

    Any questions. Join the Antix forums and post a thread there. We are friendly members there and will get to you eventually, (we are a small but pretty smart group)
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  2. #12
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    I would like to recommend Puppy Linux; it works excellently on older hardware and it's very user-friendly. Unlike some of the other small distros (I'm looking at you, DSL), I had no trouble setting up wireless on it at all. But if you use Ethernet, then DSL would be a good choice...
    There are a lot of Linux distros out there that work well with older computers. What is it that you're looking to do with your computer, exactly?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shellscriptcoder View Post
    I would like to recommend Puppy Linux; it works excellently on older hardware and it's very user-friendly. Unlike some of the other small distros (I'm looking at you, DSL), I had no trouble setting up wireless on it at all. But if you use Ethernet, then DSL would be a good choice...
    There are a lot of Linux distros out there that work well with older computers. What is it that you're looking to do with your computer, exactly?
    Browse webpages, watch streaming media, keep in contact with friends, make simple 3D models, draw stuff.
    Generally I use it to relax and unwind.
    So something that's got good html5 support (not Firefox 2.0 lol), skype, blender3D and probably inkscape.

  4. #14
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonlight_Fox View Post
    Browse webpages, watch streaming media, keep in contact with friends, make simple 3D models, draw stuff.
    Generally I use it to relax and unwind.
    So something that's got good html5 support (not Firefox 2.0 lol), skype, blender3D and probably inkscape.
    To be honest, if that's the case go with antiX or CrunchBang, as suggested above.
    Both are light on resources, but have easy access to the entire Debian repository of software.
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  5. #15
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    Yeah, I'd agree with jayd. antiX or CrunchBang would be great choices. Personally, I'd lean towards Crunchbang, but that's just my opinion...

  6. #16
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shellscriptcoder View Post
    Yeah, I'd agree with jayd. antiX or CrunchBang would be great choices. Personally, I'd lean towards Crunchbang, but that's just my opinion...
    I've not run either... so run with it.


    <cough>Slackware!<cough>
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  7. #17
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    I've not run either... so run with it.


    <cough>Slackware!<cough>
    lol... Then I'd have to say Arch! That way you can be really geeky like me.

  8. #18
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    On my Eee PC 900 I used a 8 GB SDHC card and was able to install a full Linux distro on it. I first tried Fedora, and it ran fine. I have since then upgraded the SSD and memory and have Ubuntu 12.04 on it (upgraded from 9.04). I get an error every boot, but it still seems to run just fine.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterhead View Post
    On my Eee PC 900 I used a 8 GB SDHC card and was able to install a full Linux distro on it. I first tried Fedora, and it ran fine. I have since then upgraded the SSD and memory and have Ubuntu 12.04 on it (upgraded from 9.04). I get an error every boot, but it still seems to run just fine.
    Yeah, but he's got an eee 701, and its hard drive has half the space of your SD card. Ubuntu alone would probably fill up most, if not all, of that space. Not to mention he's only got 512MB of RAM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by shellscriptcoder View Post
    Yeah, but he's got an eee 701, and its hard drive has half the space of your SD card. Ubuntu alone would probably fill up most, if not all, of that space. Not to mention he's only got 512MB of RAM.
    The 701 doesn't have a SD card slot? I ran Fedora on 512 of RAM.
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