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Alright, i had a major system issue with a command and i ended up screwing up my entire server. Fortunatly i had migrated from an exact sevrer hardware and software ...
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  1. #1
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    Need Help - Live Server Cloning


    Alright, i had a major system issue with a command and i ended up screwing up my entire server. Fortunatly i had migrated from an exact sevrer hardware and software wise in a diffrent locatioin about 10 days prior, now i have to pay to reaccess this server for a short time.
    So to the point i need to make a clone of the server expcept for netowkrin config and anythign else that should not diffrer, but i need all file perms, mysql and everything cloned onto the current server. The server im cloning is a centos and the server im restoring will be Xen with a centos Vm(to support future backups).
    Now ive read a bit and im not sure i can use DD on a remote server like this, or if i could use rsync to copy eaxctly what i need. The network connection each server has is 1gbps and a 4core hyper threaded processor at a clock of 3.2, im wondering how i can make this transfer as effiecnt as possible and allowing everything to run normally on this server

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Use dd to make a bit-image copy. Use rsync to make file system copies. These are very different, but often complementary, applications. If you are going to do a remote bit-image copy with dd, then pipe it through a compressor such as gzip (with the -c option) to the remote system. That will reduce significantly the amount of network bandwidth required to send the data. Remember that you should use a target drive that is comparable to the source, otherwise data loss may occur.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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