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Originally Posted by Irithori This especially is handy, if you not only have to update one machine, but hundreds with different scopes.. Windows doesnt have this. Also, OSX doesn't have ...
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  1. #11
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irithori View Post
    This especially is handy, if you not only have to update one machine, but hundreds with different scopes..

    Windows doesnt have this.
    Also, OSX doesn't have that.
    Jay

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    First of all, I want to tell you all thank you for the replies. I really appreciate it. Also, I'm criticizing, but with the intention of understanding your points of view. So, I hope any of you is getting angry or something for all these comments.

    The package manager tells me when a package has an update and if I decide so, it updates them. That's really easy and convenient. The problem is that complicates the installation and that consumes a lot of time to understand how to install any program. I really can't imagine people outside the engineering and computer science field using it.

    EDIT: BTW, I have a mac, and the computer with red hat. And what do you think about the app store? you install with one click, and the software updates automatically. I never need to manage anything.
    I really prefer windows than mac though.

  3. #13
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Cool... a comparison/critique is fine by me!
    I thought it was a complaint!

    The package manager tells me when a package has an update and if I decide so, it updates them. That's really easy and convenient. The problem is that complicates the installation and that consumes a lot of time to understand how to install any program. I really can't imagine people outside the engineering and computer science field using it.
    How is it hard to understand? You can deny any specific update, just like you can with Windows.
    And I am way outside the Engineering or CS field... and I use it.

    Could you give a specific instance where a Linux package manager gave you a problem?
    That might validate your 'complaint'.
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    Ok, as I mentioned before, today I had problems with python.

    I used to use it a lot in the past with windows. I never really needed anything else than IDLE.
    Today I tried to use IDLE and it gives a problem with tkinker. It says that it's not prepared for tk or something like that (I'm not in the lab right now, and I don't remember exactly). I checked the package manager and tkinker (in fact many packages related to tk) are installed. How to solve that? I don't really know. I'm going to need a lot of time to understand it. I don't have that problem with mac. Just type idle and it opens.

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Saw a mention of IDLE, but I don't use python (not a programmer) so I made no connection.
    Is your main issue with package management or with python usage?
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    No, it's just an example of the problem I had today. I've also had to spend a lot of time with other software I used to install very easily like abaqus, MATLAB, textext (inkscape) and maple.
    I like many open source software like python, inkscape and latex. I really think they are awesome.
    Linux is free and nice in many senses, but I can only find an explanation about why people prefer to pay for windows, in the difficulty regular users have when installing software and solving problems, and in its time consumption. In fact, some people prefer to pay even more for mac because of the convenience and simplicity it has.
    EDIT: maybe the complication is not to get all the necessary packages, but to make them work together.
    Last edited by copono; 06-26-2012 at 07:56 AM.

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Many programs that you mention have Linux equivalents that can be installed with a simple command, or a few clicks in a GUI.
    MATLAB continues to be an issue for many users. But that is software that is designed and written to run on Windows or OSX. Same applies for other software...
    You might have some luck running it in Wine.
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    I was quite happy with ubuntu, but It's not an option for me. I must use red hat because is what boss decided :s He's good, but well, no one is perfect.

    Thank you for the replies at this time in the night.

    If anyone has anything to add I'm very interested about your opinions.
    Last edited by copono; 06-26-2012 at 07:26 PM.

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    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    There's another point that no-one has made yet. In Windows, you get your software from a variety of sites, some of which may be rather dodgy. For example, a site may offer a free program for doing something cool, but it's actually a way of getting a Trojan horse onto your machine.

    When you have downloaded the package, you unzip it and run a program called install.exe or something like that. What does it do? You don't know, because it's in binary and you can't see inside it. It may be doing God knows what to your system.

    In Linux, you get your software from your distro's repository so it's guaranteed to be kosher. And you install it with your package manager, which is likewise guaranteed not to do you any harm.

    I know which system I prefer!
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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    I'm no computer science grad or it type, and have never had a problem with the package manager of the distro's I use (synaptic mostly). Just refresh the list of available packages, select the ap I want, click install, click apply, and the package manager downloads and installs everything needed. So far (4 years) no unmet dependencies, broken systems, or other problems, of course, I'm just a home user, not corporate.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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