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Ok, now I want to know the "correct" way to install files. So far what I've been doing is Code: tar xvcf [i]filename[/i] and then i get into the directory ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
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    The "correct" way to install files(from a tarball)


    Ok, now I want to know the "correct" way to install files. So far what I've been doing is
    Code:
    tar xvcf [i]filename[/i]
    and then i get into the directory (with "cd"), and then i type
    Code:
    ./configure
    make
    make install
    Now, this does seem to work, but for some reason I've got a feeling i'm leaving a step out. So please, if I am, tell me what step it is so I can rectify the problem. Many thanks.[/code]

  2. #2
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    There's nothing wrong with that.

  3. #3
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    Ok good, didn't want to mess something up and end up destroying 4/5ths of my harddrive...like what happens with Windows sometimes

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  5. #4
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    I've been doing the same procedure, but I really don't know what's zxvf for.

    By the way, I've been doing it -zxvf

    What's the difference between using the dash and not using it ?

    Thanks

  6. #5
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    I'm pretty sure you need to use the dash. 'z' is to zip/unzip, 'x' extract, 'v' verfiy, and 'f' is for the file name. Use 'man tar' for a more clear documentation.
    The best things in life are free.

  7. #6
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    I don't use the dash either. The man page is pretty unclear on it. Some options have a dash, some don't.

    revolve: The only was to know is to read the README/INSTALL.txt file included with the package. Ususally ./configure && make && make install will do tho.

  8. #7
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    The dash when using tar and other commands come from the old unix-dialects when you are using some programs you need the dash in traditional Unix, like HPUX and Solaris.

    Regards

    Regards

    Andutt

  9. #8
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    Most programs need the dash; they use the getopt(3) routine to parse their arguments. tar doesn't need it, however. There is simply no difference between using a dash and not using it when you're calling tar. I believe that the first versions of tar didn't use a dash, but then they included an optional dash to preserve a bit of compatibility with other programs.

  10. #9
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    The dash seems more correct to me. Being around UNIX so much, I'm so used to using it with the dash for options.
    The best things in life are free.

  11. #10
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    I agree. I'm also using a dash to tar, even though it's unnecessary.

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