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Hi guys, was reading a bit on linux setup regarding partitions etc...it was telling me that certain folders etc should have their own partitions. what is the best way to ...
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  1. #1
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    recommended setup for linux


    Hi guys,

    was reading a bit on linux setup regarding partitions etc...it was telling me that certain folders etc should have their own partitions.

    what is the best way to setup linux, i mean what are the aspects of the system that should really be on its own partition...whats the smartest way to do this

    or does it vary from situation to situation depending on what you want to do?

    any info appreciated
    jonin

  2. #2
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    It really depends on your intended use.

    If you're running a basic desktop system for web browsing, etc, then I recommend only having 3 partions: /, /home, and swap. Keeping /home separate will make switching to another distro in the future a simpler process. If you're using LVM, then /boot should be it's own partition of around 50-200MB.

    My rule of thumb is to not use too many mount points. People will recommend lots of crazy things when it comes to mount points, IMO simpler is better.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    In my opinion, sometimes those partition schemes are fear-mongering, and other times, they're legitimate.

    I personally just use two partitions: one for /, and one for swap. This is the bare minimum of what you require.

    Some people like to put /boot on a separate partition, since you don't actually need it mounted while the system is running (unless you're upgrading your kernel). Supposedly this creates better security, since no one can modify your kernel if they get access to your box.

    Other people like to put /home on a separate partition, since this allows them to use the same home directories across multiple distros that they might be running.

    Others like to put /usr on its own partition, since that's where everything gets installed.

    But yeah. I got tired of manging partitions and partition sizes, so I stopped doing it. But there's no real "This is the best way" answer, unfortunately .

  4. #4
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonin View Post
    what is the best way to setup linux,
    For me, it's a / (root) partition and a separate /home partition, and that setup has been working well enough for quite some time, now. If you aren't sure why you would need additional partitions, you probably don't need them.
    oz

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    thanks for your answers

    i like:

    Some people like to put /boot on a separate partition, since you don't actually need it mounted while the system is running (unless you're upgrading your kernel). Supposedly this creates better security, since no one can modify your kernel if they get access to your box.

    does this have to be done on setup, or can it be done after using a linux partition tool of some sort?

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    Personally, I run a / partition, /boot, and swap. It's all just preference though.

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    I'm another that prefers to have just / and /home. A swap partition if needed, but that's rare unless you're using some older kit with limited RAM.
    Jay

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    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    On my home machines, I have a / and a data partition which I mount as a subfolder of my home directory. If I had less RAM, I would also have a swap partition.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonin View Post
    thanks for your answers

    does this have to be done on setup, or can it be done after using a linux partition tool of some sort?
    Ideally it should be done during setup. It could be done any time, but it will be a big hassle after the system is already installed.

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    I went in the opposite direction for my system and partitioned out more than what was needed after reading some older unix / linux admin information on the internet. While having a / , /home , and swap partition is a good minimum. The benefits of having other partitions are valid if you have a need or a want for them but only for specific needs such as if your system is part of a network which uses a network /usr directory then partitioning out /usr/local or /opt is prudent.

    If you are running a mail, web, log, or database server then having /var partitioned out is rather reasonable since all of those normally reside in a var sub directory. /boot partitioned out is good to partition out just in case you want to upgrade to to a lvm later.

    However on an extreme end of things if you desired to have many partitions for your various sub directories then the best guideline i ever read on the subject of partitioning stated that /bin /sbin and /etc should not be partitioned out from root as they are required to load in a single load environment and having them as separate partitions could create issues in system stability and recovery. /proc /dev and /sys are also not good choices to be partitioned out as they are all working files representing the hardware or the kernel state. Finally i would not remove /root as well just as it might cause some issues if the system needs it to be there.

    All and all partitioning out of directories should be done with care. But as for how many or how few you actually need on your system or want on your system must be up to you.

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