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  1. #1

    Multi-booting and Distribution


    I want to install Linux on my laptop (Lenovo Z575), and I'm fine with installation and all that, but I was wondering whether it'd be better to use multi-boot on my system or replacing Windows with Linux completely (deleting Windows partition after installing Linux).
    EDIT: I could also try VirtualBox but I heard it's taxing on the hardware and since I want to install it on a laptop I don't think I should do that.

    I've read up on different distributions as well, and I've narrowed my choices down to Linux Mint and Ubuntu. Ubuntu's interface seems more laptop-friendly, but Linux Mint has a lot of cool user-friendly tools like custom desktops and configuration. I'm using this laptop for school (programming) and for gaming (through programs like Wine), and later on maybe a bit of graphical design. I'm thinking of installing Linux Mint and finding a custom desktop that's friendlier for my laptop, but I'd like to hear other Linux laptop users' experiences with one (or both) distributions.
    EDIT: I also heard that Ubuntu is becoming the forefront in the separation between user-friendly systems and advanced system. Since the Windows software distribution model is being updated to be more like Apple's, companies like Valve are putting more focus on Linux-based systems - particularly, Ubuntu. So it seems like if I wanted to keep up-to-date with software coming in to Linux from Windows, Ubuntu is the distribution to choose.
    Last edited by Dodosaur; 09-11-2012 at 04:33 AM.

  2. #2
    If you are a gamer, a person who watches bluray movies on your laptop, or has a critical piece of software you need that does not have a GNU/Linux counterpart i would say keep Windows. WINE is not completely compatible with all windows software and there is no AACS unscramble for linux as far as i can tell and VirtualBox does not cut it for 3D graphics.

    As for Distributions a Ubuntu derivative would be a good choice for user friendliness although the Default GUI for Ubuntu is way to close to windows 8 / Mac OSX for my personal taste. Ubuntu, OpenSuSe, and Fedora are good distributions for Up-to-date software which have Corporate backing while Mint is more community based.

    If you want a more complete listing of distributions i would check out DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD. and also play around with distributions, desktop managers, available software and mix and match what you need and what you like.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    I would always recommend dual-booting until you feel really at home with Linux. Then break the umbilical cord and get rid of Windows. But be sure to set up your bootloader so that it boots into Linux by default!
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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  5. #4
    I have one more question: how do you install Linux while keeping all your program WITHOUT an external hard drive? I can't afford an external hard drive right now and I need to keep a lot of my programs.

  6. #5
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    If you want to isntall Linux on the same hard drive with some other operating system it should be no problem. Just don't install it to the same partition(s) you use for your other operating system. Without specific partition information, it is not possible to give more detailed explanation.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    If you want to isntall Linux on the same hard drive with some other operating system it should be no problem. Just don't install it to the same partition(s) you use for your other operating system. Without specific partition information, it is not possible to give more detailed explanation.
    Does this mean I will be able to use my Windows programs on Linux (if compatible)? I haven't heard of someone installing Linux and being able to use their programs on it without an external hard drive.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru
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    You may be able to run some windows programs under Linux using a program called Wine but I doubt that most will run as well as they would on windows. You could google "using wine on Linux" for more info. You won't be able to run anything from Linux on windows unless you get some third party software to do so.

    No you don't need a separate hard drive to do this, you need a separate partition for windows and Linux. As I said above, you may be able to run some windows programs using the wine program on Linux.

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