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Hello everybody, I am fairly new to Linux (And to this website by the same fact ) and I would like to get some help to choose the right Linux ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Which distribution for Django Web Development project ?


    Hello everybody,

    I am fairly new to Linux (And to this website by the same fact ) and I would like to get some help to choose the right Linux distribution for my needs.

    Some friends and I have started a web application project which we will develop using the Django Framework, a Python framework. To host our web applications, we will be using VPS. We have the choice between KVM and OpenVZ, however we are heading for KVM as I have found some information indicating that KVM is more suitable for Django development.

    The VPS allows us to choose from a ton of Linux distribution:
    - CentOS
    - Gentoo
    - Debian
    - Arch Linux
    - Fedora
    - SUSE
    - Ubuntu
    - Scientific Linux
    - SlackWare

    And we can ask for additional distribution if we need to.

    It is important for us to limit the risk of problems when going from one of our computer to the VPS. Also, security plays a major role considering that we will have some personal information about our clients. I've read that laptop use also plays a role in distribution choice, so we must not ignore the fact that we will be using laptops from time to time.

    So, considering these facts (to sum up: new to Linux, web developers, hosted on a VPS, transition from computer to VPS as seamlessly as possible, security and laptop), which distribution would be a great bet ? Also, I don't know if it change anything, but I know that I will be using a 64bits system.

    If any additional information might be useful, do not hesitate to ask me

    Thanks all !

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    For a server I would recommend either CentOS or Debian with the preference being CentOS as it is basically RHEL without the support contract. I don't know anything about django but in general, if you are developing on Windows and deploying on Linux then be very careful to have a file naming convention and stick to it. The Linux file system is case sensitive and Windows isn't.

    If it is an option for you I would suggest developing on the same distro as you deploy to as then you will have the same versions of everything. You should at the least have a testing server that runs the same environment as your live one.

    [edit]
    Oh yeah. Welcome to Linux Forums by the way
    [/edit]
    Last edited by elija; 09-29-2012 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Practising social skills ;)
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

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  3. #3
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    Hello,

    Thanks for the reply. Developing on Windows is out of the question for us at the moment. The only possibility is that one of us might develop on Mac OSX.

    Is it a good thing to use a server oriented OS for development ? Especially for new users to Linux like us

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  5. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Linux doesn't really make the distinction in the same way as some other operating systems. If you have a Centos server with Apache, MySQL etc installed and a Centos desktop with Apache, MySQL etc installed then the only real difference is that the desktop is running a GUI and also has desktop applications installed. In fact, editing one file and rebooting can turn a "desktop" in to a "server" by switching off the GUI. The only real reasons for not running a GUI on a server are security (fewer attack vectors) and resources (use the server to do it's job rather than looking pretty).

    The difference only becomes significant with regard to support contracts.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

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