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I have been debugging my system fixing small errors but i have several errors / messages that i am not sure about. I have tried to research them but google-ing ...
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  1. #1
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    Syslog messages that i do not full understand


    I have been debugging my system fixing small errors but i have several errors / messages that i am not sure about. I have tried to research them but google-ing just leads me to webpages of log dumps.

    So i am just going to ask

    I am not sure if these are error's
    Code:
    Oct  8 07:44:38 Caesar kernel: [    0.000001] Calibrating delay loop (skipped), value calculated using timer frequency.. 6784.90
    
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [    1.106223] pci 0000:00:01.0: PME# disabled 
    
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [    1.200297] pci 0000:00:1d.0: PCI INT A disabled 
    
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [    4.307928] ahci: SSS flag set, parallel bus scan disabled 
    
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [    4.621590] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1a.0: cache line size of 64 is not supported
    However i do know these are errors however i am not sure how to fix them
    Code:
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [    4.848471] rtc0: alarms up to one month, y3k, 242 bytes nvram, hpet irqs
    
    Oct  8 07:28:44 Caesar kernel: [   11.104045] EXT4-fs (sde2): re-mounted. Opts: errors=remount-ro
    Thank you in advanced for anyone that can help

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    These really aren't errors, but more of advisories. Assuming all your hardware gear appears to work correctly, then just ignore them. They may be important if stuff doesn't work correctly. In any case, a lot of these messages are ONLY meaningful to kernel gurus, and sometimes only to those who wrote the drivers in question.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    No, it doesn't look like those are errors. During boot, the kernel will decide which options are appropriate and which aren't. This information about those decisions, as far as I can tell.

    For the second section, I don't know what the first line is.

    The second line indicates you should run fsck on the file system on /dev/sde2

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizzle View Post
    No, it doesn't look like those are errors. During boot, the kernel will decide which options are appropriate and which aren't. This information about those decisions, as far as I can tell.

    For the second section, I don't know what the first line is.

    The second line indicates you should run fsck on the file system on /dev/sde2
    Re, fsck on /dev/sde2 - possibly, but you need to be sure it is unmounted first.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Re, fsck on /dev/sde2 - possibly, but you need to be sure it is unmounted first.
    My /dev/sde2 is my root directory mount. Im not sure how to unmount it to run fsck on it.

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    Easy way:
    Linux Force fsck on the Next Reboot or Boot Sequence

    Look at the second part.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizzle View Post
    Easy way:
    Linux Force fsck on the Next Reboot or Boot Sequence

    Look at the second part.
    What I usually do is to boot into a live CD/DVD/USB device and then run fsck from there with the -f (force) option. You can also add the -c option to scan the disc for bad sectors.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
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    Hmmm i will try that to be sure. However i checked my fstab to clean out some unused hard drives on my system, and i found that my root directory was set up as UUID / ext for the filesystem mount point and type but for the options it had errors=remount-ro as the only option. I did not put that there could some program have modified my fstab?

  9. #9
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    It would be my assumption that the system installer added the option for the root file system. I know of no system or user tool which would do that for you.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha90 View Post
    Hmmm i will try that to be sure. However i checked my fstab to clean out some unused hard drives on my system, and i found that my root directory was set up as UUID / ext for the filesystem mount point and type but for the options it had errors=remount-ro as the only option. I did not put that there could some program have modified my fstab?
    This is default option for /, at least on my Debian machine.
    It means that if there's an issue mounting the root partition during boot, don't quit booting, just remount it as read-only.

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