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Big Fat Guy brought me new USB pendrive. How can I format it? Can I use a different filesystem than FAT32? (EXTx)...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie rat007's Avatar
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    How to format USB drive


    Big Fat Guy brought me new USB pendrive. How can I format it? Can I use a different filesystem than FAT32? (EXTx)

  2. #2
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    To format it (as root):
    Code:
    fdisk /dev/sda
    mkfs -t vfat /dev/sda1
    this will make a FAT format od somekind, I'm dot sure which (Ithink FAT32), I'm not suse if you can use something else.

    dylunio
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    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie rat007's Avatar
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    Thanx, this did FAT32 formating and now it works just fine. Dunno why but the default filesystem on pendrive was strange and didn't allow me to upload more than 20Megs of data even that it's 256M!

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie felipe1982's Avatar
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    This isn't working for me. I have a 128Mb usb drive that i used to use no problems in linux. After a clean install of suse 10.1, I can't seem to write to it (i checked the write protect, and it is off)

    when I type fdisk in konsole, this is what I get command not found.

    How can I format it? I don't really want it mounted anywhere -- i only wanted it formated in FAT. ps - what is the diff b/w fat and vfat?

  6. #5
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    You need to be root to use fdisk. I would recommend using cfdisk, though, as it is more user-friendly.

    VFAT was an extension to FAT16 that allowed long filenames. FAT32 is a version of the FAT filesystem that had a larger drive size limit than FAT16 did.

    You can learn more at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_Allocation_Table

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie felipe1982's Avatar
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    This is what I get at konsole
    sudo fdisk
    root's password:
    sudo: fdisk: command not found

    sudo cfdisk
    sudo: cfdisk: command not found

  8. #7
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felipe1982
    sudo fdisk
    root's password:
    sudo: fdisk: command not found
    use 'su' instead of 'sudo'
    Code:
    su -
    fdisk /dev/sda
    mkfs -t vfat /dev/sda1



    casper
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
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  9. #8
    Linux Newbie felipe1982's Avatar
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    solved: thanks

    Code:
    # cfdisk
    This works beautifully. Thanks everybody.
    Code:
    # parted
    Is another very good utility for partitioning free space, and formatting partitions. It has a few more filesystems to chose from compared with cfdisk (most I'll never use, but FAT32 on cfdisk was not compatible with my windows (xp pro SP2) whereas FAT32 in parted worked correctly.)

  10. #9
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Is another very good utility for partitioning free space, and formatting partitions.
    you can use GParted. its a front end od 'parted'.





    casper
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  11. #10
    Linux Newbie felipe1982's Avatar
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    the good thing about parted is you don't have to reboot. With GParted, you do. Gparted is much friendlier, though, which is good for me

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