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Hello guys. I decided I'm going to migrate to Linux. I've done my research and came to the conclusion that Linux, no matter what distro we talk about, will never ...
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  1. #1
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    Taking the big step - Migrating to Linux


    Hello guys. I decided I'm going to migrate to Linux. I've done my research and came to the conclusion that Linux, no matter what distro we talk about, will never be just 'ready to use'. But that's totally fine with me 'cause even though I'm not a pro with computers, I do like to learn about it an get my hands dirty, so I'm prepared to the challenge.

    But having been a Window user my whole life, I need to start from scratch, so in this post I ask for your help in choosing a distro for me.

    I have some in mind: Mint, Mageia and openSuse and Fedora.

    I want you to take as guides for your advice the following:

    1. Although my laptop is pretty new (not one year old yet), and has very good resources (3 gb ram, 300 gb storage, etc) I don't want to abuse with the heaviest tools, the fancier desktop interface, etc, because I want my machine to run fast.

    2. I don't fear using the terminal emulator.

    3. I want a stable and well-supported distro.

    4. I want to have a wide selection of software to choose from.

    5. I want something that helps me and challenges me to improve my knowledge on the OS and eventually reach the ability to use more advanced distros.

    6. I want something that, at the end, helps me doing my daily tasks (I'm not a programmer nor work 20 hours per day on the computer; I just use it to write in Latex, browse the web and not many thing more.)

    Thank you for your help!

  2. #2
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    Yeah, I know: I hadn't read the FAQ of the 'Newbie' section. Well I have now and it answered my question the way I expected.

    Apologies for wasting your time.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    No problem. Welcome to the forum and to linux. Some additional info for you. Distrowatch.com is a useful site for finding and reading about different distro's. They have a list of the top 100 (of more than 700 they have on file) distro's downloaded by users. They also have a search function which lets you describe some of the criteria you want to search for, such as older computer, debian based, etc, and it will list the distro's that meet that criteria. Let us know if we can be of any help, and have fun.
    Registered Linux user #526930

  4. #4
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    welcome
    a debian-based distro like antiX or crunchbang may be what you are looking for,FYI
    check them out if you want
    "What you think about me is none of my business"
    _______________________________________________
    antiX | SolydX | Puppy Slacko

  5. #5
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Looking at your post, I agree that a Debian-based distro, or even straight Debian, would work well for you. Lots of hardware support, and literally tens of thousands of software packages available.

    If you don't mind a little more fiddling with things, Slackware was also a thought. Fast, solid and robust. Package management might give you a few fits early on, but it's pretty easy to get used to thanks to sites like SlackBuilds. And, since you can always install software from source code, software is easy enough to find.
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
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    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer
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    I highly recommend Linux Mint for new users. Generally speaking most things will work out of the box, so you won't be trying to figure out how to get sound to work and that kind of nonsense.

    Then, just use it every day. As you do more and more things on it, you'll learn more. I'm a pretty knowledgeable linux user now, and I still use a Mint distro as my primary on my laptop because it's just easy, no fuss computing.

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