Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1

    How to get wireless drivers from one distro to use on another


    Is there a way to get a wireless driver from one distro, slap it on a flash drive and transfer it to another that doesn't already come with it? for example, i have no problems connecting to a wireless connection when i boot up BackTrack..but lets say i boot up Mint or ubuntu i have to first plug into direct connection to download the wireless driver (which is broadcom BTW) . I would appreciate to hear any tips or tricks to get past this

  2. #2
    Just Joined! awc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by DatSik View Post
    i have to first plug into direct connection to download the wireless driver
    Figure out what package the driver is in and copy that to your thumbdrive

  3. #3
    Hmmm, well do you have any tips on doing this? im not sure where to begin searching? thank you for your input

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Just Joined! awc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    40
    1. Download/install the drivers for the card

    2. Find the driver the card is using

    Code:
    sudo lshw | grep -A 15 network
    Look at the output for the wireless card. The driver is identified by driver=

    *-network
    description: Wireless interface
    product: RT2800 802.11n PCI
    vendor: Ralink corp.
    physical id: 6
    bus info: pci@0000:04:06.0
    logical name: wlan0
    version: 00
    serial: 00:1a:ef:
    width: 32 bits
    clock: 33MHz
    capabilities: pm bus_master cap_list ethernet physical wireless
    configuration: broadcast=yes driver=rt2800pci driverversion=3.2.0-23-generic

    firmware=0.34 ip= latency=32 link=yes maxlatency=4 mingnt=2 multicast=yes

    wireless=IEEE 802.11bgn
    resources: irq:21 memory:fb100000-fb10ffff


    3. Find the package the driver belongs to

    Code:
    dpkg -S `sudo modprobe -l | grep driver_name`
    If this returns a package with "linux" or "image" in the name then the drivers ship with the kernel. But that shouldn't be the case.

    4. Locate the package

    Code:
    ls -l /var/cache/apt/archives/ | grep package_name_from_step_3
    5. Copy the package

    If step 4 showed the package being in /var/cache/apt/archives/ then copy it to your thumb drive. If step 4 returned nothing then the package isn't on your system and you'll have to google a download for it.

  6. #5
    This is what step 3 gave me.

    root@bt:~# dpkg -S `sudo modprobe -l | grep b43`
    linux-image-3.2.6: /lib/modules/3.2.6/kernel/drivers/net/wireless/b43/b43.ko
    linux-image-3.2.4: /lib/modules/3.2.4/kernel/drivers/net/wireless/b43/b43.ko
    linux-image-3.2.6: /lib/modules/3.2.6/kernel/drivers/net/wireless/b43legacy/b43legacy.ko
    linux-image-3.2.4: /lib/modules/3.2.4/kernel/drivers/net/wireless/b43legacy/b43legacy.ko

  7. #6
    Just Joined! awc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    40
    That's showing that the driver for your wireless card is included in the package linux-image..., which is the kernel. I'm assuming that you've installed that kernel as part of an update. Find out what kernel you're currently running, and look for the respective package in /var/cache/apt/archives

    Code:
    $ uname -a
    If the package isn't in /var/cache/apt/archives/ then google a download for it

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •