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Also, to increase the confusion You can have many users connected to your computer each having its own display and keyboard and mouse. These are called multi-head systems. it is ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    Also, to increase the confusion You can have many users connected to your computer each having its own display and keyboard and mouse. These are called multi-head systems. it is mostly a hack, but it can be done none the less. See this Build a Six-headed, Six-user Linux System LG #124

  2. #12
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    Don't use telnet over the Internet

    Quote Originally Posted by jselover View Post
    ... but if you are connecting from a stock Windows system, this [telnet] is your only choice, as Windows is only modern OS that doesn't include a ssh client...
    For anybody out there thinking of using telnet for connecting to a Linux/Unix server from the Inernet... just don't. OK? These days using unsecured clients is just aking for trouble.

    If you want to connect to a Linux server from a Win client, then ssh is the protocol I'd advise using. How? Get a copy of PuTTY. You can get a copy and review the licence details here. It's free.

    The server's administrator will need to store the public key for you, the private one will be stored on your client. Instructions are in the downloadable help files. Enjoy.

    Achim

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jselover View Post
    Let me try to sum it for you. Linux has many ways to connect multiple users, as shown by the other posts here.

    If you are trying to equate to how Windows does multi-user, where more than 1 user is logged into the console, each with their own desktop, and switching between them without logging off, then you are looking for the "Switch User" option under the Gnome desktop. KDE likely supports this, too, but I am not sure what it is called. I am not sure how many users are allowed to log in one time, but since, like Windows, all users must share one keyboard, mouse and monitor, how many are really practical? 3 or 4? Certainly not more than 12, right?
    Yes, KDE does also have switch user. Also you can start more than on Xserver on a machine as weill as using switch user (either way, you are sharing the same screen and keyboard).
    If you are talking about text console sessions, then as mentioned above, up to 12 virtual consoles can be logged on at one time, but the user can only see 1 of them at a time, and the user switches between virtual consoles using Ctrl-Alt-Fnn. Different users can log onto each virtual console.

    If you are talking about connecting via network, well then, a whole bunch of other options are available.

    You can configure X-Windows to accept network connections, and then 1000's of users can log onto one system using Xnest, or Xephyr, or X-Windows itself. These type of connections are like Windows RDP sessions, although these are only practical on a LAN.
    The product is "X Window" (not "X windows" ) or simply X. in 1984 it was at major version 8. X is sometimes referred to with the major number such as X9 (when color was added in 1985).
    For WAN Desktop connections, there is NX Machine, that uses X-Windows, but provides caching, compression, and encryption via ssh for Internet connection Desktops. Again, this is like multiple RDP sessions.

    Another option for remote desktops is using VNC server/client connections.

    If you only need to connect to a text session, then, as velikij says, ssh is the connection of choice. Telnet use is discouraged due to its insecurity, but if you are connecting from a stock Windows system, this is your only choice, as Windows is only modern OS that doesn't include a ssh client.

    As to the total number of users, your numbers are more or less correct, 4 billion unique users are supported by 2.6+ kernels, but your average PC is not going be able to support that many users at once. The real limit as to how many users can be logged on at once is a function of connection type (GUI or text), what programs the users will be using, and the systems's resources (# threads, RAM, etc.). A lot of users (like 100's) can log on and do text data entry, but only a few will be able to do 3D-CAD at once.

    This list is by no means complete as to possible connections types. That is one of the beauties of Linux, the possiblities are almost endless.
    If you want a specific example, you will need to tell us what kind of mutil-user access you are looking for.
    Unix was licensed based on the number of users that could be connected via serial lines plus one for the console. Any number of connections could be used via the network. Hence you saw lots of Unix systems that had a two user license (minimum that could be bought) and most users were connected via telnet sessions (which have been replaced by ssh sessions).

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    Hi All Experts,

    i have two questions:

    1. If Linux providing Virtual Terminals ( Text ( 1-6) + GUI (7-12) ) then why we need to "SU" command ?
    How "SU" command is differ from "SUDO" command. Plz give me simple example so that i can easily
    understand at once ?

    2. If we talk about Drives or Partitions in Windows OS, then it is very simple to recognize drives like C, D, E, F.
    But Linux is so difficult to understand that where i will save my Work and documents Like Music, Word/Excel/Pdf
    file, many Stuffs. I have installed Redhat Linux ws 4 in my Computer and it is Looks like in this manner:

    At desktop, there are three icons Like 1. My computer 2. Root 3.Trash
    After click on " My Computer", it is showing 1. Floppy 2. Network 3. File System
    After Click on "File System", it is showing some folders like 1. etc 2. bin 3. usr 3. lost-Found 4.... 5.... 6... 7... so many

    How can i create Partition in GUI mode so that i can keep Linux OS in First drive and Music in Second Drive
    and Documents in third Drive. ?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ift38375 View Post
    Hi All Experts,

    i have two questions:

    1. If Linux providing Virtual Terminals ( Text ( 1-6) + GUI (7-12) ) then why we need to "SU" command ?
    How "SU" command is differ from "SUDO" command. Plz give me simple example so that i can easily
    understand at once ?
    The "su" command is "switch user" and defaults to root. The "sudo" is a single command run as an other user (also defaults to root) and this command can restrict the commands that a user can run and also commands that can be run from a host machine. The password for "su - root" is the root password while the password asked for by "sudo" is the current user's password.
    2. If we talk about Drives or Partitions in Windows OS, then it is very simple to recognize drives like C, D, E, F.
    But Linux is so difficult to understand that where i will save my Work and documents Like Music, Word/Excel/Pdf
    file, many Stuffs. I have installed Redhat Linux ws 4 in my Computer and it is Looks like in this manner:
    The handling of drives in Linux comes from that of UNIX and is from 1969. Back then drives were small and there was no partitioning. Partitioning the drives happened when the drives got bigger (around 1980) and the "exteded partition) was created by IBM during IBM-PC days when the drives had to much wasted space due to limitations in the FAT filesystem (which was a vert slight modification to the C/PM filesystem which was geared to hold the whole directory (of the 8 inch floppy) in memory. But as we see the MBR style partitioning is limited to a max allocation space of 2Tb. To correct this and be able to use larger (than 2Tb) drives, use the GPT style partition table (which uses more disk space for the partition table but can span very large partitions and a large number of partitions.
    At desktop, there are three icons Like 1. My computer 2. Root 3.Trash
    After click on " My Computer", it is showing 1. Floppy 2. Network 3. File System
    After Click on "File System", it is showing some folders like 1. etc 2. bin 3. usr 3. lost-Found 4.... 5.... 6... 7... so many
    The location of the files saved by a user are within his/her "home" directory (typical location is /home/THE_USER_NAME) and is where you are put when you do a "cd" command (also see the value of the environment variable "HOME" via the shell command: echo $HOME
    How can i create Partition in GUI mode so that i can keep Linux OS in First drive and Music in Second Drive
    and Documents in third Drive. ?
    To put different directories on different drives (or partitions) would only work for a single user as they would be mounted in that user's home directory. In a case where you create a group "ourmusic" and "ourdocuments" you could the group to users that would then share (by group membership access) a common mount point outside of the "/home" directory tree.
    Last edited by alf55; 01-01-2013 at 03:36 AM. Reason: Added more info on drive layout.

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