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Ubuntu is Based on Debian. The Ubuntu developers add more software to a default installation to make it more novice-friendly. Debian is a distribution that has been around since the ...
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  1. #11
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Ubuntu is Based on Debian. The Ubuntu developers add more software to a default installation to make it more novice-friendly.
    Debian is a distribution that has been around since the mid-90s, so it's a base for quite a few other distros.
    See the DistroWatch page, here. Or the Debian homepage, here.

    *EDIT*
    Keep in mind, the initial installation of Debian can require a little work in the command line to get it setup. But once you're finished, it's a system that will remain stable and require little to no other configuration.
    Last edited by jayd512; 01-28-2013 at 09:27 PM. Reason: see EDIT
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    Hm, so they're not the same... Well anyway, since I have to delve into the commands jungle right from the start then probably Debian is not the right tool for me at the moment. But sooner or later it will find a place on my computer, that's for sure. I just need to get used to the feel and functionality of Linux first, and then I will be able to look into more robust and stable alternatives.

    Thanks for the tips

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    Quote Originally Posted by monere View Post
    Well anyway, since I have to delve into the commands jungle right from the start then probably Debian is not the right tool for me at the moment.
    In that case, Mint is a great starting point. Everything usually works right away for you. And if you want to open a terminal window, the option is there. Just so you keep it in mind, once you have some level of familiarity with the command line, many tasks can be accomplished easier and/or faster.
    Also, if anything happens with your system, sometimes the CLI is the only option for fixing a borked system.
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    Ye, I'm aspiring to becoming a Jedi master of Linux commands but I have a feeling it will be a long and perilous journey till then

    Can I ask you 2 questions?

    1) Do you happen to know why sound doesn't work on Mint 14 x64 Xfce? Is it the version of Linux (namely x64 bits)? Is it the desktop? Is it the Mint version itself? I have tried everything I could try (without solutions that include commands obviously ) and I even installed gnome-alsamixer (whatever this does) but I can't make the damn sound work.

    Which is why I am currently looking to install another distro but this time on 32 bits and see if it makes a difference.

    2) Do I need to create one swap file for each distro I install or is one enough? I only have one drive (a 500GB Seagate Barracuda HDD) and I put Mint on a 50GB partition while the swap-file is on a separate 10GB partition. (I have 2GB RAM btw)

    I know, the swap partition is way bigger than it needs be but when I created it I didn't know anything about the importance of partitioning and stuff. Anyway, should I create 2 more partitions for the swap files of the next 2 distros I will install or is the one I already have enough? What's your opinion on this? I am asking you cause you reply way faster than the others and I don't feel like waiting days to install a new distro

    Please let me know, if it's not too much trouble for you.

    Oh, wait! One more question please: how do I make the numapd active? It's not the num lock key (in case you were about to say this). It's something else but I don't know what. Any ideas?

  5. #15
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by monere View Post
    Do I need to create one swap file for each distro I install or is one enough? I only have one drive (a 500GB Seagate Barracuda HDD) and I put Mint on a 50GB partition while the swap-file is on a separate 10GB partition. (I have 2GB RAM btw)
    You'll only need one SWAP partition, and you can cut the size on it down to about 4GB since you have 2GB of RAM.
    oz

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    1) It may just be an issue of needing a driver. Starting a new thread for that issue would get you the best advice. Try either the Mint section, or Hardware/Peripherals. Make sure to include the output of lspci and lsmod.

    2) You only need one SWAP partition. Each installed Linux distro will be able to make use of it.


    Fr the numpad, that's an odd issue. I've never run into that one. Is it a separate pad, connected via SB or bluetooth?
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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    You'll only need one SWAP partition, and you can cut the size on it down to about 4GB since you have 2GB of RAM.
    Cool.... but how do I do this? I right clicked on the partition in gparted and I only have 2 options "swapoff" and "manage flags". I assume I will have to click on swapoff first but won't this brake my OS??

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    Quote Originally Posted by monere View Post
    Cool.... but how do I do this? I right clicked on the partition in gparted and I only have 2 options "swapoff" and "manage flags". I assume I will have to click on swapoff first but won't this brake my OS??
    The easiest way to manipulate partitions is by using a liveCD (such as Parted Magic) to boot your machine, then you run gparted from within the live disk environment. Doing it this way, you aren't as likely to run into issues where gparted complains because the hard disk that is to be changed is mounted by the Linux system on the hard drive.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    1) It may just be an issue of needing a driver. Starting a new thread for that issue would get you the best advice. Try either the Mint section, or Hardware/Peripherals. Make sure to include the output of lspci and lsmod.

    2) You only need one SWAP partition. Each installed Linux distro will be able to make use of it.


    Fr the numpad, that's an odd issue. I've never run into that one. Is it a separate pad, connected via SB or bluetooth?
    Let me start with no. 2: Beautiful! That's exactly what I was hoping to hear

    Now, point no.1 : Ok, I will start a tread on this topic but only after I play with the other 2 dstros. I already feel like a kid in a candy shop with so many options and goodies as opposed to Windows

    And for point no.3: it's only the simple numerical pad that's on the right hand side of keyboard. It doesn't work no matter what key I press.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oz View Post
    The easiest way to manipulate partitions is by using a liveCD (such as Parted Magic) to boot your machine, then you run gparted from within the live disk environment. Doing it this way, you aren't as likely to run into issues where gparted complains because the hard disk that is to be changed is mounted by the Linux system on the hard drive.
    K! Will do exactly like this

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