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I have two questions. On the wikipedia page of Distributions I noticed that Zorin doesn't appear. Does anyone know if Zorin is based on Ubuntu? My second question is where ...
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  1. #1
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    Two Basic Questions about Linux


    I have two questions. On the wikipedia page of Distributions I noticed that Zorin doesn't appear. Does anyone know if Zorin is based on Ubuntu? My second question is where do you go in Linux to see how much disk space you have?

  2. #2
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregoryshock View Post
    I have two questions. On the wikipedia page of Distributions I noticed that Zorin doesn't appear. Does anyone know if Zorin is based on Ubuntu? My second question is where do you go in Linux to see how much disk space you have?
    Hello

    Yes, it is based on Ubuntu according to the front page at the Zorin Linux website.

    You can see your partition layout and the space they use by running the following fdisk command:

    Code:
    fdisk -l
    Note that it is a lower-case letter "L" in the command and not a number 1.
    oz

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    * I am not sure what I just did wrong. But simply just typing in fdisk -l in the terminal doesn't show me anything.

    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$ fdisk
    Usage:
    fdisk [options] <disk> change partition table
    fdisk [options] -l <disk> list partition table(s)
    fdisk -s <partition> give partition size(s) in blocks

    Options:
    -b <size> sector size (512, 1024, 2048 or 4096)
    -c[=<mode>] compatible mode: 'dos' or 'nondos' (default)
    -h print this help text
    -u[=<unit>] display units: 'cylinders' or 'sectors' (default)
    -v print program version
    -C <number> specify the number of cylinders
    -H <number> specify the number of heads
    -S <number> specify the number of sectors per track

    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$ fdisk-l
    fdisk-l: command not found
    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$ fdisk -l
    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$

    * However This command "df -h" showed me this....


    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb1 109G 5.6G 98G 6% /
    udev 1.9G 4.0K 1.9G 1% /dev
    tmpfs 780M 932K 779M 1% /run
    none 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock
    none 2.0G 844K 2.0G 1% /run/shm
    /dev/sda2 255G 70G 186G 28% /media/6662EAF862EACBBD
    /dev/sda1 200M 29M 172M 15% /media/388AED808AED3B50

    Could someone please tell me what I am doing wrong?

  4. #4
    oz
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    The ubuntu based distros might require that you use sudo with the command:

    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    If it works that way, you'll probably need to put sudo in front of most of the commands that you run.
    oz

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    That seems to work!

    Here is the results.

    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for gregory:

    Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x1326197e

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 411647 204800 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2 411648 533389311 266488832 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda3 533389312 594198527 30404608 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda4 594198528 625142447 15471960 12 Compaq diagnostics
    /dev/sda5 533391360 594198527 30403584 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

    Disk /dev/sdb: 122.9 GB, 122942325248 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14946 cylinders, total 240121729 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00067f05

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 * 2048 231886847 115942400 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 231888894 240119807 4115457 5 Extended
    /dev/sdb5 231888896 240119807 4115456 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregoryshock View Post
    My second question is where do you go in Linux to see how much disk space you have?
    Now that you know your partition sizes (via the fdisk -l command), you can then see how much of the filesystem (with which a given partition is mounted) is used, using the df command, e.g.:

    Code:
    df
    to get more human-readable output, try:
    Code:
    df -H

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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    Now that you know your partition sizes (via the fdisk -l command), you can then see how much of the filesystem (with which a given partition is mounted) is used, using the df command, e.g.:

    Code:
    df
    to get more human-readable output, try:
    Code:
    df -H
    I tried it and this is the results.

    Code:
    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$ df -H
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb1       117G  6.0G  106G   6% /
    udev            2.1G  4.1k  2.1G   1% /dev
    tmpfs           818M  934k  817M   1% /run
    none            5.3M     0  5.3M   0% /run/lock
    none            2.1G  132k  2.1G   1% /run/shm
    gregory@gregory-DG965OT:~$
    Last edited by atreyu; 03-06-2013 at 08:40 PM. Reason: added CODE tags to aid readability

  8. #8
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    so, as you can see, the first partition (sdb1) on that hard drive is ~117GB, and it has 6GB used and 106GB available, or 6% used. It is mounted as the root ("/") filesystem. You can ignore the other entries in the output, they do not refer to physical hard disks.

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