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hi guys, i have 2 boxes a pretty good box running centos 6.3 and an older p4 running slackware 14 i think which os am i better off learning command ...
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  1. #1
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    different shells and distros


    hi guys,

    i have 2 boxes a pretty good box running centos 6.3
    and an older p4 running slackware 14 i think

    which os am i better off learning command line on
    centos cause its a red hat clone, and i would work with more red hat machines in future?

    is the bash version the same? and is bash the best command shell to learn and use?

    also in centos is there a way to view the groups you have
    i created a group and want to see it in the groups list but cant

    i googled and saw a command cat /etc/groups but it tells me the file doesnt exist.

    i want to create a group, put users in it and apply group permissions to a folder set i created

    thanks for reading
    Last edited by j0n1n; 04-17-2013 at 12:10 PM.

  2. #2
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    People might howl me down for saying this but

    Because Gentoo is exclusively command line (including the install) that might be a good place to start learning command line.

    Or you could merely decide to use command line only for what you are using...

    Either way you'll make mistakes and you'll learn by getting yourself out of your mistakes (with help from the forums)

    While there is a site of command line for linux I lost the book mark when I changed OS a while ago.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! teyster2's Avatar
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    Learning Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by j0n1n View Post
    hi guys,

    i have 2 boxes a pretty good box running centos 6.3
    and an older p4 running slackware 14 i think

    which os am i better off learning command line on
    centos cause its a red hat clone, and i would work with more red hat machines in future?

    is the bash version the same? and is bash the best command shell to learn and use?

    also in centos is there a way to view the groups you have
    i created a group and want to see it in the groups list but cant

    i googled and saw a command cat /etc/groups but it tells me the file doesnt exist.

    i want to create a group, put users in it and apply group permissions to a folder set i created

    thanks for reading
    OK, I know I'll be ostracized for saying this, but, there is a reason Linux Mint and Ubuntu are always #1 on DistroWatch.org. The fact that you're willing to learn is
    enough in my book. Start with basics as in linuxcommand.org.
    I've been happy with Linux for 17 years and like users
    of other systems I picked it up as I went a long. If I need to know "something" today then I search that "something" today.

    Enjoy your experience.

  4. #4
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    You will be better off staying with Slackware, if you learn Slackware every other linux distro is a piece of cake. Centos, Mint, ubuntu are all great distros
    but if you want to know the nuts & bolts of how linux works, Slackware is it. I use several other distros but Slack is the one that will always be there stable
    and fast.

  5. #5
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    Another good distro to learn the command line on is Arch. I use it and love it. Install is completely command line as well. And it actually doesn't have an official installer (you can find scripts to guide you, but you learn a lot from doing it manually), there is a great wiki guide to follow if needed. Arch's wiki has just about anything you need on there as well. Unlike Gentoo, it has precompiled packages (which is a killer for some). It wasn't mentioned, so just giving you another option!

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Which distro you focus on depends on what you want to to.

    Bash will be pretty much the same across them all, however they will have different tools and file locations. Package management is a good example. Yum, apt and pacman are just a few of the tools used for that. Apache configuration files are stored in /etc/apache2/ in Debian based distros and /etc/httpd/ pretty much everywhere else. There are many other differences of this kind.

    Slackware will give you a near vanilla Linux experience as they famously do not patch any of their software and CentOS will give you a near exact (no RHN) Red Hat experience to the level it can be used to practice for Red Hat Certification.

    Someone looking for a career as a Linux admin should at least have knowledge of Red Hat (or CentOS) and Debian along with a few others and someone learning this for fun should pick the distro they like using day to day.

    To all the other guys who posted: You'll not get flamed, ostracised or shouted down here for having an opinion, as different perspectives are always welcome.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  7. #7
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    As many pointed out, for personal, it becomes a matter of preference. For business, a Red Hat flavor, whether it is Red Hat, CentOS, Fedora, or any of the other workalikes will at least get you comfortable with where files are located. As pointed out, bash is bash. So you can learn command line anywhere, but locating configuration files moves on different flavors. I have been doing Linux since 99 and Unix since the late 80's. I have tried numerous distributions and just am more comfortable with Red Hat flavors. It's kept me in work at least. I remember one distro actually allowed you to play Tetris while it was installing. Ubuntu is another distro that seems to have gained favor in the past few years. Most jobs I see posted are looking for RedHat experience.
    So for yourself, get a bunch of PCs and have a ball installing and trying different versions to see what you like. For work, check the job listings to see what they are looking for and then focus on those distros. I got was one of the first to get RHCE back when Red Hat was at Triangle Park, so I kind of stay there.
    I just wish they quit mucking with the desktop. I got used to the old Gnome and KDE, but now I have to work to get it to a working set. I have tried Cinammon and others but just want the old interface back. Ah well.

  8. #8
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    as always thanks for all the input!!!

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