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Hey, I didn't know that Mint recommends a complete re-install. I'd personally find that a pain in the arse. Since this sounds like a lab with multiple users, some safe ...
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  1. #11
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    Hey, I didn't know that Mint recommends a complete re-install. I'd personally find that a pain in the arse. Since this sounds like a lab with multiple users, some safe choices now are

    1. Debian stable with Xfce (if you don't mind re-installing, and you don't need bleeding-edge packages)
    2. Lubuntu via "sudo apt-get install lubuntu-desktop" (if you're using an LTS, say 12.04, already and don't want to re-install everything).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pacopag View Post
    Hey, I didn't know that Mint recommends a complete re-install. I'd personally find that a pain in the arse.
    It's in the documentation, e.g. look for the "How to upgrade to a newer release - Linux Mint Community" page. (I can't post the URL because I don't have enough posts here yet.)
    "In a "fresh" upgrade you use the liveCD of the new release to perform a new installation and to overwrite your existing partitions." "This is the recommended way to upgrade Linux Mint"

    Further down the page they give good justifications for recommending a fresh install each time, but I think despite that, most people would rather just click or type a single command and let everything happen automatically. That's much less work than manually downloading and burning a new disk image, backing up your user data, booting from the new disk, and installing again. Most people just don't want to lose a few hours with that every six months.

  3. #13
    Just Joined! fenario's Avatar
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    hi dnacombo

    you can turn compiz off with a panel applet called: fusion icon (find it in synaptic). it will revert back to metacity. you can also install kde-window-manager, which is highly customable and any effects you don't want can be turned off.

    regards
    fenario

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