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Greetings Everyone, from the Wet Mountains in Colorado! On April 6th of this past month, our house burned completely to the ground. Were all ok, with the exception of one ...
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  1. #1
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    Going 100% Linux... I Hope


    Greetings Everyone, from the Wet Mountains in Colorado!

    On April 6th of this past month, our house burned completely to the ground. Were all ok, with the exception of one dog, and an injured rabbit. The insurance is supposed to try and offer us a settlement by Monday, so were just waiting on that to play out before committing to our rebuilding plans.

    I posted over the summer, about needing help with an install of a Linux Distro on an old Micronics desktop. I want to thank everyone for the much needed help back then. Now Im in need of help once more in rebuilding my network by this fall, using Linux distros as my primary OS(s).
    Since I dont have anything Microsoft anymore, Im thinking that this is a good time to declare my independence from the mega-corp! I need your help.

    Im going to give yall a little background, so youll have a better idea where Im going, and what Im trying to achieve.
    We live on a developing 40 acre farm, and we were planning on building our dream home after the farm started to make a profit- even if it was going to be in the black.
    As a disabled combat veteran my personal desire since I got back from Iraq, has been to turn my sword into a plowshare- kind of like the Roman Legionnaires would go by a farm or pub after retirement. I also want to make our farm into an educational tool one day, to teach folks (through internships) how to build a sustainable, diversified family farm, and how to grow food in an extreme climate like ours.
    So farming and hands on education about agriculture, are the focus of other items that I want to include into my computer network. Along with this, Im going to need certain packages for certain things.

    My level of expertise is out dated, as I left the I.T industry in late 2001. I used to know NT-4, Win 2000, and of course Win 95/98 and ME- as well as some DOS. I first found Linux as a free CD in a magazine. The Gnome disk of that time in 2000 was interesting, but I didnt have time to really do anything with it. (Other than make the penguin my favorite bird!) I used to build my own desktops back in the day, and used to have a small home network at one time. The hardware has changed quite a bit, as well as how we communicate these days. I admit, Im an old fart thats forgotten a lot, and now that Im looking at going 100% Linux, I think it is best that I pretend I know nothing, and start out as just another stupid userLOL.

    So, Im typing away to yall on my sons beat-up Dell laptop, with Windows 7, and I think a coolant fan is wearing out on this thing. What Im going to be in the market for soon is a good desktop, where I can expand upon for this future network.

    To summarize what Im in need of for my Linux network;

    Desktop with multiple hard drive options

    1) An email client that is very much like MS Outlook
    2) Office Libre- decked out like MS Publisher
    3) A money management suite, like Quick Books
    4) Multi- media platform that includes syncing;
    a. Music for I-Pod
    b. Photo shop like program
    c. Video camera download, editing and upload features for making You- Tube videos and the like.)
    d. Video download for Silverlight (Netflix- unless there is something better)
    e. Kindle, or something compatible (never had an E- reader before)
    f. Brother all- in- one color network printer (scan, fax, etc)
    5) Peripheral devices such as, thumb drives, external hard drives, web cam, wireless networking, etc (Im also thinking of finally getting a cell phone service with perhaps Android. Btw I hate Facebook and texting)
    6) Tele conference package of some sort, and Skype, is what I think were going to be using with the non- profit organization I was just elected to be vice chairman of. More on that as it develops.

    File Server

    1) Raid
    2) Able to handle storage from the primary desktop, and other networked computers
    3) Accessible via wireless, cable and through a secure web server.

    Web Server

    1) Dont know much about these things, however, I like the idea of being able to access the stuff I want or need from distant locations.
    2) Another idea with the web server I had, is to allow certain board members from the non- profit, access to certain files.

    The other things, that Ill need to include into this overall concept is;
    1) Wireless security camera network that covers my entire farm. This isnt so much because of intrusions, but more for when were out of town so we can keep an eye on the livestock, actual weather conditions, and on the crops. The only intruders I ever really worry about are of the four legged type like, cougar, bear, bobcat and coyotes. These are the gang bangers of my "hood". Once in a while, teenagers cutting a fence, or poachers trespassing, would be nice to identify and report with documentation.
    2) Home weather station set-up is important for our operation as well.
    3) Remote access for drip irrigation is an option Im entertaining, along with remote light control for when were out of town.
    4) Point of sale package that is compatible with Linux is something well need in the 2014 growing season, when we establish a farm stand, and do farmers markets. Along with this, we are exploring the idea of accepting EBT for food stamps.
    5) Website provider that is Linux friendly, so I can build our farm website.

    Well, thats about it. Given the fact that the fire utterly destroyed everything computer and software related, along with my file cabinets containing livestock registration, records, vehicle titles, etc, Im going to include a fire proof vault in the new house plans that will contain the servers, important papers, photos, ammo and weapons I dont normally have on me or handy.

    For now, if anyone can recommend anyone that has new desktop systems, and can put together an above package for a desktop, Id really appreciate it! As for the servers, etc, thats going to be later on- perhaps in early 2014 before I can realistically start putting that together.

    Thanks much!
    Randy

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    Very sorry to hear of your bad luck, very unfortunate.

    Grab a Norco case for your server very reasonably priced, lots of expansion and drive bays especially in the 24 bay models, 20 bay is great as well.

    For raid you can go for hardware raid or use zfs with cheap sata cards. Either will work with Linux or Unix. Just make sure to choose ones that are compatible with the distro you choose to go with.

    For the desktop I'd build it yourself, stick with nVidia graphics. Spec wise depends really on your budget, if you let us know how much you want to spend on each part of the network, like desktop, server etc. Then we could recommend specific parts.

    Home weather monitoring system and power monitoring etc,I'd use raspberry pi's for those, very cheap way to achieve a great deal. They run a few different flavours of Linux you could use one of those for media viewing on your TV with openelec a ready made SD image which comes loaded with xbmc add in icefilms and you can stream movies and TV. In fact quite a few of the things you want to achieve could be done by a few of them very cheaply, small websites can be run from them too.

    Food for thought, let us know your budget.

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    Wow! I'm sorry for the loss of your house and especially your dog, that's terrible.

    I wouldn't worry about rusty IT skills. I think the willingness to try new things and research when you encounter something you don't know trumps most specific knowledge.

    Desktop items:
    1.) Email client like Outlook - I honestly can't help much there. I'm fond of Gmail, Google's web mail. Microsoft's new Outlook.com free webmail is nice too, and it works just fine from a browser running on Linux. Maybe someone else can suggest something better.
    2.) Libre Office should do the job.
    3.) GnuCash is open source and it does some money management. There are a few other accounting packages for Linux, open source and otherwise, but I am not familiar with them or Quickbooks so I can't give a fair comparison. The last time I did pay serious attention to this was nearly ten years ago, and at that time the prevailing wisdom was that QuickBooks had no Linux-compatible alternative. I hope that's changed. Thanks to the Wine project (which lets you run some Windows programs on Linux), you may be able to use Quickbooks directly.
    4.) There are fine music and video players for Linux, but I don't know about syncing. I'm sure someone has it. I use the online backup service SpiderOak (there are many others - Hibernate, Crashplan, etc...) and that offers automatic syncing between devices. Getting Netflix to run on Linux can be a headache - the Fuduntu Linux distribution had it working out of the box, but they just announced that the distribution is being discontinued. Still, it can be done.
    5.) For peripheral devices, most should work easily. To be certain, just do a web search on Linux + the name of the product you're thinking of buying to see if you can find out if it is known supported or not.
    For phones, IF you are in an area with Sprint reception I wholeheartedly recommended the service Ting.com, which is a Sprint reseller (like Virgin Mobile, only with way less suck). Ting.com billing is by use, period - if you use more minutes, text, or data, your bill goes up, if you use less, it goes down. No overage fees, no minimums. (And no, I am not a paid shill.)
    6.) Google Hangouts and Skype work fine on Linux, so you should be safe there. There are also a number of Linux-compatible alternatives to Citrix Gotomeeting for Teleconferencing.

    File Server
    1. RAID - most consumer motherboards support RAID 1 (redundancy), so for a cheap server you can do that. You can also do software RAID, in which the drives are connected to the motherboard normally but the kernel is configured to spread the data across the disks. But you could always get a decent RAID card if you're serious about professional coverage.
    2. No problems, you just need to do some research to set it up.
    3. Setting up a secure web server for file access is more research, but not terribly difficult. ownCloud might be a good place to start looking, but that's a guess - I haven't done it myself.

    I can't help you with the rest except for hosting - there are tons of choices that are Linux-friendly. Amazon rents virtual Linux servers, Rackspace, Google, and hundreds of other lesser and greater companies. Even Microsoft has Linux virtual servers available for rental.

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    email. use both webmail and a email client.
    I use Thunderbird email client with email from 1) My ISP, 2) Gmail, 3) My own hosted domain (useful to allocate many email addresses to others to use in my charity work)
    I set all systems to retain emails on servers and download locally to desktop/laptop as POP (This gives a remote back up and a local systems). This has worked well in business and family matters for some years and works across both Linux and windows systems.
    Thunderbird is not as all encompassing as MS Outlook, but adequate for all domestic in EU and foreign outside EU matters.
    Use your own domain on your server, but also get a domain on another hosted server purely to act a form of 'drop box' private file storage by FTP to keep a separate location records of your critical records. This is the IRS, farm stock etc records that are important.
    GnuCash is not as friendly as QuickBooks but in USA it works. ( I keep my accounts on QuickBooks on a windows machine as Linux systems for UK VAT taxation are some what rare; and system is now with 12 years records so change is not really wanted.) However there is a legal firm in west USA who use only Linux software and use GnuCash and Libre Office very successfully ( from my contacts a few years ago) so I am sure you can get a local Linux User Group to help you. Best wishes.

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    USdragon, sorry for your loss(es). Hope insurance takes care of everything and the rebuild without issue. Like you I am trying to get away from M$ to the maximum extent possible--preferably 100%. Although I've been using Linux for most of my computing for several years I have not gotten away from it completely. Despite a lot of experience with Linux I still consider myself a novice. Here's my 2 cents on you requirements list.

    1) An email client that is very much like MS Outlook -- I use Thunderbird. While not like Outlook it is a very full featured mail client. Likewise, for Evolution but Thunderbird seems to be the better of the two. I have not found a Linux email client with all the features of M$ Outlook. Don't care for Gmail because of Google mining everything that goes through them. A plus for Gmail is I think with the proper client syncing with Gmail, calendaring, and scheduling may be easier. Google being a major player also meaning cross platform may well be easier. The downside to me is Google mining everything for data.
    2) Office Libre- decked out like MS Publisher -- LibreOffice is good. Sometimes harder to figure out how to do things if you are accustomed to Office since the menus are not identical.
    3) A money management suite, like Quick Books -- I use Quicken in Windows. Don't think it will run under WINE in Linux. Do not know of any Linux software that is the equivalent to QuickBooks, Money, or Quicken in the Linux world. Haven't really explored using any of these using WINE-original Windows Emulator but now WINE is Not an Emulator. winehq.org does have a good db on Windows applications and how well they run under WINE and how to make them run under WINE.
    4) Multi- media platform that includes syncing -- need more information. There are lots of very good Linux applications for video, pictures, music and editing all of these.
    a. Music for I-Pod -- several good music players with import capability. You can import or copy mp3 directly to the system, import CDs using multiple formats from mp3 all the way to lossless. You should be able to mount the iPod can copy files to it. I like RhymthBox.
    b. Photo shop like program -- GIMP is a great product. You'll have to learn how to use it.
    c. Video camera download, editing and upload features for making ‘You- Tube’ videos and the like.) There are apps for this. OpenShot is good.
    d. Video download for Silverlight (Netflix- unless there is something better) -- don't know about this.
    e. Kindle, or something compatible (never had an E- reader before) -- I use a Color Nook and Nooks has software for multiple platforms -- tablets (iPad, Android Tablet, Nook Kids for iPad, Windows 8 Tablet), smartphones (iPhone, iPod touch, Android), computers (Windows PC, Mac, & Windows 8 PC), and Nook for Web. My experience with Nook and syncing is not 100% positive. My Android will sync from my Color Nook, but for some reason the Color Nook does not sync with the Android. Not a big issue for me so I haven't really gone looking for a fix.
    f. Brother all- in- one color network printer (scan, fax, etc…) -- check with brother for Linux drivers and software. I use Epson and while it works the driver and/or associated software is not a good as the Windows versions. I do experience a problem printer envelopes from LibreOffice in Linux, but none from LibreOffice in Windows. Filled a bug, nearly a year ago and it still is not resolved.
    5) Peripheral devices such as, thumb drives, external hard drives, web cam, wireless networking, etc… (I’m also thinking of finally getting a cell phone service with perhaps Android. Btw… I hate Facebook and texting) -- I have no issues with thumb drives, external hard drive (I use 2 different Western Digital USB HDs), my LogicTech webcam, or wireless networking. Wireless can be a little bit of a pain in the neck depending on hardware. Once you get it figured out, save the software and configuration steps someplace safe. In two years when something goes wrong, you will have forgotten what you did and/or how you did it, if you don't.
    6) Tele conference package of some sort, and Skype, is what I think we’re going to be using with the non- profit organization I was just elected to be vice chairman of. More on that as it develops. -- Skype works fine on my Linux systems. I do not use the phone just video calls.

    File Server

    1) Raid -- relatively easy and with various options. Most, if not all, discussed in previous posts.
    2) Able to handle storage from the primary desktop, and other networked computers -- very "doable" with Linux.
    3) Accessible via wireless, cable and through a secure web server -- ditto.

    Web Server

    1) Don’t know much about these things, however, I like the idea of being able to access the stuff I want or need from distant locations.
    2) Another idea with the web server I had, is to allow certain board members from the non- profit, access to certain files.

    From what you are saying, I think a web server may not be the best solution. You could set up a secure FTP server and provide file sharing via that. This assumes all you want to do is file share.

    The other things, that I’ll need to include into this overall concept is;
    1) Wireless security camera network that covers my entire farm. This isn’t so much because of intrusions, but more for when we’re out of town so we can keep an eye on the livestock, actual weather conditions, and on the crops. The only intruders I ever really worry about are of the four legged type like, cougar, bear, bobcat and coyotes. These are the gang bangers of my "hood". Once in a while, teenagers cutting a fence, or poachers trespassing, would be nice to identify and report with documentation. -- Should be easy with one assumption. The cameras provide connectivity to Linux systems. Don't know about software on the Linux side though.
    2) Home weather station set-up is important for our operation as well. -- Don't know.
    3) Remote access for drip irrigation is an option I’m entertaining, along with remote light control for when we’re out of town. Don't know.
    4) Point of sale package that is compatible with Linux is something we’ll need in the 2014 growing season, when we establish a farm stand, and do farmers markets. Along with this, we are exploring the idea of accepting EBT for food stamps. -- Don't know.
    5) Website provider that is Linux friendly, so I can build our farm website. -- Here I think the issue in not a Linux friendly provider, but choice of web development tool provides web pages that work with the website provider. I think this is not much of an issue, except developing a good interactive website is a non-trivial task. Setting up a Linux based.

    Setting installing a LAMP Linux server is easy. LAMP = Linux, Apache (most popular web server in the world), mail (sendmail), and PHP (a widely-used general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for Web development and can be embedded into HTML). Installing all the patches is easy. Securing it more difficult. Administering more difficult. Typically, you do server admin from the command line (I think) vice a GUI when in the Linux word.

    General comments on Linux. I use Ubuntu and Linux Mint. Don't care for some of the changes to Ubuntu's interface. Linux Mint is more like older versions of Ubunut prior to Ubuntu moving to Unity. Installation is typically very easy. Patching after install in a one time download and one reboot and the system is current. Depending on internet access speed and computer speed, you can install and patch Linux in an hour or so. Installing you applications depends on which ones and how many. Literally there are thousands of apps ranging from bad to great and the vast majority of them are free. There are apps you can purchase; I haven't as yet found a need.

    Here is my list of frustrations with Linux. Scanning software is not as good as Windows. May well be issues with Epson not providing similar software in their Linux software as they do with Windows. This may not be an issue with other printers. Research, research, research! Ditto for envelop printing. While Linux mainstream variants are light years a head of where they were years ago, they still have a long way to go match M$ ability to work with lots of different hardware and have good software/drivers for the devices. Lenovo I believe has good Linux support if you don't want to build your own system(s). If you build your own, ensure you use the Linux hardware compatibility information on the internet. It will save you headaches. Don't know if you really need a huge number of HD bays. With today's HD sizes and cost per gigabyte, that may not be necessary. Consider using SSD HD(s) for you OS and either hybrid or regular HDs for file storage. If you really want RAID, mirroring is probably all you need vice the more advanced RAID configurations. However, that statement is dependent on you actual requirements.

    Security is better with Linux, in my opinion. However, really locking down a system may take more time because of the learning curve coming from the Windows/DOS world. Linux is most definitely NOT WINDOWS. Strongly encourage you do set up you desktop(s)/laptop(s) with at least 2 partitions--one for /home and / for the OS. There are also other partitioning schemes which expand on this and may well be better overall; however, there are huge advantages to having / and /home in separate partitions as a opposed to everything in /.

    Virtualization is good in Linux. This may well be a solutions if you cannot find things you like in the Linux world and still need Windows for something. Dual boot also might be a solution.

    Something to watch out for is M$ has written a secure boot requirement in order to be certified for Windows 8 that may cause problems for installing Linux and/or dual booting. There is supposed to be work arounds, but be careful.

    Happy to discuss more with you if you would like.

  7. #6
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    Sorry to hear about your misfortune. I can't help you with a lot of things, but I'll post in red the comments/suggestions I have..

    Quote Originally Posted by USDragoon View Post
    To summarize what I’m in need of for my Linux network;

    Desktop with multiple hard drive options
    Roll your own, you can build one cheaper than a manufacturer. Most motherboards and cases can support multiple hard drives. As for hard drive 'options' - per-se, you'll need to look into a particular mother board and see if its sata controller has the options you want

    1) An email client that is very much like MS Outlook
    I disconnected from 'client' mail a long time ago and use gmail - highly recommend it. Though as far as clients like outlook go, your best bet is thunderbird. Maintained by Mozilla (same guys who make Firefox), it's your best bet at hitting close to outlook, too. My dad uses it daily (or used to) on his Winbox.
    2) Office Libre- decked out like MS Publisher
    3) A money management suite, like Quick Books
    You can check out a program called GNU cash, and see if that has your requirements. Else there's a website (mint.com I believe) that you can manage all that stuff with. Though if you like your info on your computer, I'm pretty sure GNU cash is pretty good.
    4) Multi- media platform that includes syncing;
    a. Music for I-Pod
    b. Photo shop like program
    c. Video camera download, editing and upload features for making ‘You- Tube’ videos and the like.)
    d. Video download for Silverlight (Netflix- unless there is something better)
    e. Kindle, or something compatible (never had an E- reader before)
    f. Brother all- in- one color network printer (scan, fax, etc…)
    a. It's been awhile, but I think most stuff will sync with regular iPods, the iPod touch was iffy last I checked, you couldn't load music on it. I was using rhythmbox to load stuff on my iPod (5th gen) - it acted just like iTunes in that regard.
    b. GIMP
    c. Check out kdenlive for editing video, I'm not sure about camera download, I usually just copy/paste it off the camera's SD once the camera is plugged in in mass storage mode. Not sure if kdenlive has youtube upload features, but once you edit it it's very easy using youtube's video manager to upload the exported video if it doesn't (which is what I do, but I don't use kdenlive, I'm not fond of it (though it's good), I crumble and use Adobe's premiere when it comes to that.
    d. No idea
    e. Ditto
    f. Drivers in Linux are always a gamble, it's up to the manufacturer if they want to provide them for Linux, if not, some of the default driver (like the CUPS system) *MAY* work for *SOME* of the functions. So you may be able to print off of it, possibly scan, but there's lots of "possiblys" and "maybes" here. Fax should be independent.

    5) Peripheral devices such as, thumb drives, external hard drives, web cam, wireless networking, etc… (I’m also thinking of finally getting a cell phone service with perhaps Android. Btw… I hate Facebook and texting)
    Any thumb drive or external HDD should work fine. I recommend the Logictech C310 for the cam, works fine with default (no logitech) drivers in Linux, I have an ASUS wifi card..I forgot the model but it says "Linux capable" on the box, which is why I got it - not even sure if I installed drivers - I think it worked out of the box..
    6) Tele conference package of some sort, and Skype, is what I think we’re going to be using with the non- profit organization I was just elected to be vice chairman of. More on that as it develops.
    Not sure of any conference packages like Lync or something...but Skype works well, if you pay for the monthly (yearly?) fee, if one person in the call has it, everybody can video share. Else-if it cuts you off in terms of video, but it still works fine for phony. Not sure Skype scales well to many people, though :-\. Google hang-outs does, though. Again, not a client, just a web service. It runs via a plug-in in your browser, I personally use it instead of Skype, but with Skype your transmission is encrypted, so that's a plus.
    File Server

    1) Raid
    Get a dedicated RAID card, don't rely on motherboard RAID. There's one RAID card, can't remember for the life of me what it was right now, it's like 120 bux I think, 2 SAS (4 SATA each) connectors, pretty famous card, pretty highly supported.
    2) Able to handle storage from the primary desktop, and other networked computers
    SMB share is probably your best bet here. Though I'm not particularly good with network sharing..
    3) Accessible via wireless, cable and through a secure web server.
    A regular router + switches if you need more connections should work fine here. If you need to handle many computer's workload, you'll need to buy a more expensive router, but I can't really say any specifics as I've only dealt with home stuff. Also, depending on server load, Apache should work fine for the web server.

    Web Server

    1) Don’t know much about these things, however, I like the idea of being able to access the stuff I want or need from distant locations.
    2) Another idea with the web server I had, is to allow certain board members from the non- profit, access to certain files.
    Look into SSH/SFTP, you can control your entire OS remotely (it's a regular shell), it's completely encrypted, and with SFTP you can do file management easily, manage users by groups, restrict access, etc. (it's standard UNIX login). There's plenty of SFTP clients for Linux, I'm sure (aside from "sftp" command line), such as WinSCP (which is epic for Windows) and Cyberduck for OS X. Should also help with your remote access issues. I'd say that's a better bet than a web server...
    Can't really comment on the other hardware you mentioned there .

    There's a lot of stuff to manage right there. Try to focus on one particular problem, approach if, and if you can't figure out how to tackle it, post about it. There's a lot of info in one condensed place here and I'm getting confused with it all to say the least (it's a very large and open ended question).

    Hope that helped some!!

    Best of luck, post again if you have other Q's.

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    Thanks so much, folks!

    You all have given me a lot to chew on. I'm looking at the Raspberry Pi, and I'm very impressed!

    I am going to start with a desktop system, then start building out from there. As for a budget- I'm willing to spend upwards of $2,000.00 on my desktop system. I'd rather stay away from having to dual boot to M$, and am regarding my current situation as like being dropped off on another planet. M$ does not exist as the mega power on this world. (in my mind )

    A Distro I was looking at for some time is Linux Mint. I understand that it's supposed to be rather friendly for users migrating from M$ to Linux. Also, I read somewhere that it allows for good network control as an admin. I think Mint is from the Ubuntu base?
    Anyhow, the only distro I ever had current experience with, has been Wary Puppy 5.1. It was so simple to wipe M$ XP off of a corrupted hard drive, and rid the virus's that were prevalent. I had a hard time trying to figure out the file system on Puppy, and just started to figure out some of the commands to find downloads. I think I'm going to need a book of commands for whatever distro I end up with.

    Randy

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    Quote Originally Posted by USDragoon View Post
    Thanks so much, folks!

    You all have given me a lot to chew on. I'm looking at the Raspberry Pi, and I'm very impressed!

    I am going to start with a desktop system, then start building out from there. As for a budget- I'm willing to spend upwards of $2,000.00 on my desktop system. I'd rather stay away from having to dual boot to M$, and am regarding my current situation as like being dropped off on another planet. M$ does not exist as the mega power on this world. (in my mind )

    A Distro I was looking at for some time is Linux Mint. I understand that it's supposed to be rather friendly for users migrating from M$ to Linux. Also, I read somewhere that it allows for good network control as an admin. I think Mint is from the Ubuntu base?
    Anyhow, the only distro I ever had current experience with, has been Wary Puppy 5.1. It was so simple to wipe M$ XP off of a corrupted hard drive, and rid the virus's that were prevalent. I had a hard time trying to figure out the file system on Puppy, and just started to figure out some of the commands to find downloads. I think I'm going to need a book of commands for whatever distro I end up with.

    Randy
    Yeah, it's Ubuntu based. And yeah, the Pi has some impressive video *coding capabilities. Especially for the price tag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by USDragoon View Post
    Thanks so much, folks!

    You all have given me a lot to chew on. I'm looking at the Raspberry Pi, and I'm very impressed!

    I am going to start with a desktop system, then start building out from there. As for a budget- I'm willing to spend upwards of $2,000.00 on my desktop system. I'd rather stay away from having to dual boot to M$, and am regarding my current situation as like being dropped off on another planet. M$ does not exist as the mega power on this world. (in my mind )

    A Distro I was looking at for some time is Linux Mint. I understand that it's supposed to be rather friendly for users migrating from M$ to Linux. Also, I read somewhere that it allows for good network control as an admin. I think Mint is from the Ubuntu base?
    Anyhow, the only distro I ever had current experience with, has been Wary Puppy 5.1. It was so simple to wipe M$ XP off of a corrupted hard drive, and rid the virus's that were prevalent. I had a hard time trying to figure out the file system on Puppy, and just started to figure out some of the commands to find downloads. I think I'm going to need a book of commands for whatever distro I end up with.

    Randy
    As far as the Netflix, here is the install instructions for Ubuntu style distros. Just copy and paste one command at a time in the terminal. How to Watch Netflix in Ubuntu Linux - Tutorials Blog
    Additionally, if you have any further issues with Netflix, then follow this guide. Best to copy and paste this one as to avoid errors as one letter mixups will delete stuff. Netflix on linux prompts for silverlight update - How to fix : linux
    Also, if your planning on that much of a budget for a PC, I can give you the site of a place that builds high end PC's for very good prices. I'm not sure if it's allowed on the forums, but if you want the site addy, private message me. I found it cause I am also looking at a new PC and some places wanted way too much. It's gonna be where I get my next PC from for sure

  11. #10
    Just Joined!
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    Quote Originally Posted by USDragoon View Post
    Thanks so much, folks!

    You all have given me a lot to chew on. I'm looking at the Raspberry Pi, and I'm very impressed!

    I am going to start with a desktop system, then start building out from there. As for a budget- I'm willing to spend upwards of $2,000.00 on my desktop system. I'd rather stay away from having to dual boot to M$, and am regarding my current situation as like being dropped off on another planet. M$ does not exist as the mega power on this world. (in my mind )

    A Distro I was looking at for some time is Linux Mint. I understand that it's supposed to be rather friendly for users migrating from M$ to Linux. Also, I read somewhere that it allows for good network control as an admin. I think Mint is from the Ubuntu base?
    Anyhow, the only distro I ever had current experience with, has been Wary Puppy 5.1. It was so simple to wipe M$ XP off of a corrupted hard drive, and rid the virus's that were prevalent. I had a hard time trying to figure out the file system on Puppy, and just started to figure out some of the commands to find downloads. I think I'm going to need a book of commands for whatever distro I end up with.

    Randy
    Another item to consider is "what do you need from your OS?" There are many Linux distros out there that have their own qualities and abilities. Don't give up if one doesn't suit your needs, because there is another that will. I have heard good things about Mint. You also need to consider things like ease of use, depending on your level of experience. I have tried many and at one time or another they usually met my needs. There are also distros out there that you may not see right away. I have found a few just by recommends from others. I am now settled on Ultimate Edition 3.5, which I love. The 3.4 Lite is also a popular one. Zorin OS is set up to be an easy transition to Linux from users that are accustomed to Windows. All these are popular Ubuntu based distros. Puppy is good for a minimal system and is quite impressive for it's size. I had a good time with SolusOS too. Explore my friend.

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