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Originally Posted by atreyu what do you mean by "access it"? i'm not sure i understand your question. See bolded part. Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC Oooh. Okay, I hit a ...
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  1. #21
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    what do you mean by "access it"? i'm not sure i understand your question.

    See bolded part.
    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Oooh. Okay, I hit a little snag. I used Fedora LiveUSB creator to make a LIVEUSB. I try to boot from it in Windows 8, but nothing happens. I'll try some different BIOS settings, but I think Legacy Boot is enabled right now. Maybe if I turn off UEFI boot, who knows. I read around a little bit, but none of the issues match mine. No rush to answer though, I'm working on some other stuff so I'll be away for a bit. If there's anything obvious that I'm doing wrong, please point it out. Thanks!
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  2. #22
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Well, that's quite the revelation. Makes sense! You could also install it as a full on OS, right? What are your thoughts on that, as opposed to a dual boot or just a live boot?
    I only use Linux. I tried dual booting for awhile until I got pretty smooth with Linux and then finally deleted Windows completly and that was ......when Windows XP arrived. Dual boot or LiveUSB/CD/DVD makes sense for new to Linux people.
    Last edited by MikeTbob; 05-09-2013 at 01:30 AM. Reason: changed from Windows 2000
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  3. #23
    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    Sorry for the imprecise terminology. I'll try to make things clearer.

    And that sounds like a reasonable guideline. I'll definitely stick to temporary instances of Linux for now, I'm not confident in the recovery ability of Windows 8, so LiveCD's (Like what you have been saying) should be where I start.

    Thanks SO much everyone for the help!

    best,
    DonQuixoteMC

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  5. #24
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    Maybe you are not clear about USB drives... They are really a serial device all goes over a single (differential data), but the design is to make these devices look like they are a normal disk usually by the driver for the device. So you can use about any USB device as a disk. That stated the BIOS must know about the device, that's why, in the BIOS you should have an entry for booting off a USB device. If you do not have this option, you cannot use a USB device for installing any OS.

    Also, you NEVER boot something from within another OS, boot means to come up from nothing, so it expects to have the whole machine to itself. Also Windows has never been very social. As with all statements never use never....

    The live DVD/CD will run out of memory, so if it asks about formatting a disk, you are not using a live version... Usually you can read the Windows data, so you can put the live iso file somewhere it's easy to get at so you can use something like
    Code:
    dd
    to copy to the USB and you will have your iso image to a bootable USB.

    Of hand I don't know how to build one with windows, I'm sure you can find it via Google.

    When you get it up under Linux, try the
    Code:
    lspci -vv
    , which asks for very verbose output. This gives you information on all PCI devices, which is where most of them live. Especially check out your communications ports.

    You should also know about man pages, so for lspci, you would do
    Code:
    man lspci
    which is the manual pages for that command. If it's missing, the command is probably not installed.

    I used the # sign to enter the [] stuff, it enters it correctly.

    Best of luck

    Jack
    Last edited by jkwilborn; 05-09-2013 at 01:37 AM. Reason: mistakes...

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    You could also install it as a full on OS, right? What are your thoughts on that, as opposed to a dual boot or just a live boot?
    i dual-booted for a while, but eventually stopped booting Windows and went full-bore Linux. For a short time it was handy for temporary playing, but really, it just became a stall tactic. It kept me from switching over entirely to Linux. I do have some legitimate reasons to keep Windows, but I have it on separate machines.

    i don't really like using Live distros on a regular basis, unless it is a particularly fast one, like Puppy or DSL. i use them pretty much exclusively for testing and disaster recovery.

  7. #26
    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    Yeah, my knowledge of (As I'm going to broadly call it) technology is extremely informal and limited. I have a lot of learning to do.
    I do know how to make boot drives with Windows, so in theory I should be able to do this.

    I'll also have to learn a lot of the commands you're suggesting. I think I'll be using the "man" command an awful lot. Thanks for the help!

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    i dual-booted for a while, but eventually stopped booting Windows and went full-bore Linux. For a short time it was handy for temporary playing, but really, it just became a stall tactic. It kept me from switching over entirely to Linux. I do have some legitimate reasons to keep Windows, but I have it on separate machines.

    i don't really like using Live distros on a regular basis, unless it is a particularly fast one, like Puppy or DSL. i use them pretty much exclusively for testing and disaster recovery.
    Perfect, you guys have answered my question completely. Thanks!
    My goal right now is to keep a Windows desktop and a Linux laptop, but we'll see what turns out to be more practical.

    One more question: Since I'm so unfamiliar with Linux, I'm going to try to put this in terms of windows.
    I installed an SSD into my laptop. SO, when installing Linux, how could I put the base operating system and important programs on the SSD while still putting the less important programs and libraries onto the hdd? Also, does Linux involve many updates or writes to a drive? I know SSD write-endurance is partially a myth, but still I just want to make sure I won't be writing Terabytes of stuff onto it within the first few months (I think I already know the answer to that question: NO because [most distros?] of Linux aren't big sized OS's like Windows)

    Anyway, just wondering how that whole process would work
    . Thanks again!

    Best,
    DonQuixoteMC

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    I installed an SSD into my laptop. SO, when installing Linux, how could I put the base operating system and important programs on the SSD while still putting the less important programs and libraries onto the hdd? Also, does Linux involve many updates or writes to a drive?
    Your best bet would probably be to install the OS to the SSD, as it is faster and newer, and keep your data that is not so frequently accessed (like backups, etc.) on the older HDD. You don't really want to put libs and progs on the slower drive, as the system uses them (esp the libs) more often than you realize. The installer for your Linux distro should identify clearly which drive is which, but they'll be referred to as "sda" and "sdb" probably. it is important to know which is which, so make sure you identify that.

    Then select whichever is the SSD for your OS install. You can format and mount the HDD after the install. If it has data on it that you want, just don't touch it during the install and it should be left alone, and you can access it afterwards.

    Linux probably has fewer writes to disk than Windows does, on average, so don't hassle it. your SSD will probably outlive your motherboard.

  10. #29
    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    Awesome, I mean, I should have thought that question through. I'd have to put a distro on the SSD about 20 times before I would do the same amount of writes as one Windows 8 install. And, the nice thing about a new computer is, I don't have any baggage to worry about! SO that's convenient. And what you said about "sda" and "sdb," I should find out which my motherboard considers the primary drive (meaning, sda would be my HDD (because it was there first) and sdb would be my SSD)? Or am I mis-interpreting that

    Thanks, this just sounds better and better

  11. #30
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    Well... that was unexpected. I was messing around in the terminal, entered some combination like... rm -rf, and now everything's gone...What should I do?









    Hehe


    Just kidding, THAT WAS AWESOME! I got the live boot to work, and I have to say: if I were to choose an OS based on the default desktop backgrounds, Linux would be #1 (The distro I booted through Live USB was Linux Mint 14, MATE [I'm guessing "MATE" is the GUI setup?])

    So far everything seems to be working. I don't know how to detect hardware or anything, but I could see it detected my hard drives (and their partitions) perfectly, my wi-fi works, the only thing I noticed was that my touchpad lost a little functionality (nothing to cry about). Assuming drivers work similarly in both operating systems (obviously not the exact same drivers) I'll try to find one with some more advanced controls.

    Thanks for the help! I'm sure I'll be back to bother you guys later, but for now I think I'll just tinker with things and get acclimated. Thanks again!!

    Best,
    DonQuixoteMC

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