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Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC And what you said about "sda" and "sdb," I should find out which my motherboard considers the primary drive (meaning, sda would be my HDD (because ...
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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    And what you said about "sda" and "sdb," I should find out which my motherboard considers the primary drive (meaning, sda would be my HDD (because it was there first) and sdb would be my SSD)? Or am I mis-interpreting that
    yes, that is pretty much right. typically, it looks like this:

    primary IDE master = sda
    primary IDE slave = sdb
    secondary IDE master = sdc
    secondary IDE slave = sdd
    SATA 0 = sde
    SATA 1 = sdd
    etc.

    but these days, you might not even have IDE drive support in your PC, so SATA 0 is sda and so on. With machines with both IDE and SATA, IDE is usually first, but it is no sure thing (i've seen the reverse).

    but like i said, contemporary Linux installers are pretty good about identifying your hard drive (by Make, Model and even serial number some times) and by kernel device (sda, sdb, etc.), so it will be clear. note that you can usually jump to a virtual terminal (at least in Anaconda in Fedora/CentOS/RH) by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F2 and running commands to interrogate the disks, e.g.:

    show drive size and partition info:
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    show drive model name
    Code:
    grep -H . /sys/block/sd*/device/model

  2. #32
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Well... that was unexpected. I was messing around in the terminal, entered some combination like... rm -rf, and now everything's gone...What should I do?









    Hehe


    Just kidding, THAT WAS AWESOME! I got the live boot to work, and I have to say: if I were to choose an OS based on the default desktop backgrounds, Linux would be #1 (The distro I booted through Live USB was Linux Mint 14, MATE [I'm guessing "MATE" is the GUI setup?])

    So far everything seems to be working. I don't know how to detect hardware or anything, but I could see it detected my hard drives (and their partitions) perfectly, my wi-fi works, the only thing I noticed was that my touchpad lost a little functionality (nothing to cry about). Assuming drivers work similarly in both operating systems (obviously not the exact same drivers) I'll try to find one with some more advanced controls.

    Thanks for the help! I'm sure I'll be back to bother you guys later, but for now I think I'll just tinker with things and get acclimated. Thanks again!!

    Best,
    DonQuixoteMC
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    My heart sank for a fleeting moment. Thanks for that. I think you'll be just fine. Enjoy your new toys.

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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Well... that was unexpected. I was messing around in the terminal, entered some combination like... rm -rf, and now everything's gone...What should I do?
    go to bed and reinstall in the morning. srsly, that brings up a good thing for n00bs to do: create some protective aliases for yourself (and root) before you do anything catastrophic. edit your ~/.bashrc file and put this in there:
    Code:
    alias mv='mv -i'
    alias rm='rm -i'
    alias cp='cp -i'
    these commands say to always prompt before overwriting when moving, deleting, and copying files. this is overridden by the "force" or "-f" (as in "rm -rf") switch, but at least it is a start.

    I'm guessing "MATE" is the GUI setup?
    yes, it is a fork of the ubiquitous GNOME Desktop Manager that has a "classic" look and feel (the GNOME 2.x version). This came from the GNOME 3.x version that came out recently and went overboard in the opinion of many GNOME users - basically, it looks like your desktop is a giant smart phone. try it some time (or don't).

    have fun!
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  4. #34
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    Haha sorry, Mark, I just couldn't pass up the opportunity. It seemed like the perfect total blunder for someone like me

    And thanks, Atreyu, things are making so much more sense. Isn't there also a default failsafe if you make two users? Like, in root, there's no failsalfe, but if you create another user and do stupid stuff, it will prompt you first? You're right, I should learn to do things like that anyway, but I was just curious if that also was true.
    And thanks for the explanation about MATE and Gnome, I had heard that Gnome 3 got a little bubbly in the gui, thanks for the confirmation. And I think you're right, I shouldn't have much of a problem figuring out which hard drive is which, thanks for the commands too! They will be invaluable

    Thanks so much, guys! Now I'm going to bed to dream about all the fun stuff left to do!!

    Best,
    DonQuixoteMC

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Oh, and how do I access .xorg driver files? I'm looking at a "tutorial" for improving touchpad performance, it looks pretty straightforward, I'm just curious where to start
    the tut should mention it - but try /etc/X11/xorg.conf for starters.
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    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    Perfect. I will do that!

  7. #37
    Linux Newbie jkwilborn's Avatar
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    I only have Linux on my machine. I have an HD with Windows 8 on it, but it's in the closet, I have a distaste for it. What I did was:

    Purchase a disk (actually had one, but 500 GB drives are about 50 bucks and 1 TB drives on sale 65 bucks..) install it, boot off the Windows 8 install disk and install Windows 8. Remove the Windows 8 disk, install another disk, install Linux.

    Now you have a machine that could be used for Windows, if need be. But the main OS is Linux. I also have an HD drive that I had Debian Linux Squeeze on it, I have it in the machine, so I can dual boot back to a version that I had with all my PGP keys and other stuff on it. It's un-mounted most of the time, but you can mount it and read or write to it.

    I purchased a 1 TB 'network storage drive' (~ 100 bucks) that I save current workings on, so when I was ready to dump the Windows disk, I copied what I needed over to the network drive, like my music. Now when I boot, all my stuff is on the network, so no problems finding anything....
    That's what I did, make the computer yours and configure it as you wish. Changing drives is easy as is networks.

    Jack

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Isn't there also a default failsafe if you make two users? Like, in root, there's no failsalfe, but if you create another user and do stupid stuff, it will prompt you first?
    good question, and yes, there is something you can do. at least on Fedora/CentOS/RH systems, you can put login files in this directory:

    Code:
    /etc/profile.d/
    just give the file any name you want, and a ".sh" file extension. The file extension is important b/c all users with a Bash shell (the default shell on many Linux systems) will automatically source these files when they log in. Similarly, users with a C/T-shell will source all ".csh" files in that dir. These login files do not need to be executable, btw.

    so create a file, let's call it /etc/profile.d/mylogin.sh and in it, put the aliases:
    Code:
    alias mv='mv -i'
    alias rm='rm -i'
    alias cp='cp -i'
    of course, you can put any other profile stuff in this file that you want to be global (for all users).

    NOTE: to test a login script, just source it, like this:
    Code:
    . login.sh
    when you source a file, everything is done in/to your current shell, not a sub-shell (like when you run a shell script), so watch out that you don't put "exit" in there!

  9. #39
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonQuixoteMC View Post
    Well... that was unexpected. I was messing around in the terminal, entered some combination like... rm -rf, and now everything's gone...What should I do?






    Just kidding, THAT WAS AWESOME!
    Gadzooks, man! Don't scare me like that!
    Now that I'm over a small heart attack, I can say this... NEVER EVER login as root! For that exact reason!
    A small mistake turns into a huge FUBAR!
    Jay

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  10. #40
    Just Joined! DonQuixoteMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    good question, and yes, there is something you can do. at least on Fedora/CentOS/RH systems, you can put login files in this directory:

    Code:
    /etc/profile.d/
    just give the file any name you want, and a ".sh" file extension. The file extension is important b/c all users with a Bash shell (the default shell on many Linux systems) will automatically source these files when they log in. Similarly, users with a C/T-shell will source all ".csh" files in that dir. These login files do not need to be executable, btw.

    so create a file, let's call it /etc/profile.d/mylogin.sh and in it, put the aliases:
    Code:
    alias mv='mv -i'
    alias rm='rm -i'
    alias cp='cp -i'
    of course, you can put any other profile stuff in this file that you want to be global (for all users).

    NOTE: to test a login script, just source it, like this:
    Code:
    . login.sh
    when you source a file, everything is done in/to your current shell, not a sub-shell (like when you run a shell script), so watch out that you don't put "exit" in there!
    I'll have to do this right off, in case I actually do something really stupid. I read somewhere that if the (I don't know the technical term) start of the command line(shell prompt?) end looks like this(this is just an example) me@Linuxbox:~$ then you are not entering commands as root, but if it looks like me@Linuxbox~# you are. Is that true? I'd like to get used to commands and set up multiple logins anyway, but I was just curious.

    Gadzooks, man! Don't scare me like that!
    Now that I'm over a small heart attack, I can say this... NEVER EVER login as root! For that exact reason!
    A small mistake turns into a huge FUBAR!
    Sorry, Jay! I couldn't resist. From now on I won't be pulling silly stuff like that haha
    I definitely could see how a newbie like me could run into A LOT of issues with that. That's why the first thing I'm going to do is create failsafes for myself before I REALLY screw things up.

    And thanks Jack for that detailed process. It sounds like our situation is relatively similar, I'm glad I won't be running into any problems (from the sound of it) I look forward to getting settled on a distro and graduating up from LiveUSBs!

    Thanks again, guys!

    Best,
    DonQuixoteMC

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