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This is my first post on this forum so if I am doing anything incorrect please tell me. So to start out what I am trying to do is to ...
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  1. #1
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    Creating a persistent live cd in Yumi


    This is my first post on this forum so if I am doing anything incorrect please tell me.

    So to start out what I am trying to do is to be able to boot up in Yumi , select my mint live CD and have it save any changes I make to it. So far I have been successful in booting to Mint but I can't seem to get it to be persistent. Any help or advice would be most appreciated.

    One more thing is that I am using a Transcend 3.0 16 GB USB on my netbook that has a 3.0 USB port.

    Edit: Just to clarify I want it to save the changes to systems settings and users as well as files I make.
    Last edited by JaredC; 06-20-2013 at 05:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    I've never used Yumi but in Ubuntu, gksudo usb-creator-gtk works well for this. I would go to the Menu in Mint and look for something with a similar name. Also, unetbootin should work for Mint.

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    You can't do this with a CD - they are write-only media by definition unless it is a CD-RW disc, in which case it may not be supported by your version of Linux. However, you CAN create a live USB thumb drive with persistent storage. Pre-partition the the thumb drive with one partition that is FAT-32 format, and one that is a Linux file system, such as ext2/3/4. Format that file system with a label that can be easily found, such as USB_HOME. Then in your image files add a mount for LABEL=USB_HOME to /home in the image's /etc/fstab, and then create the bootable image to burn to the fat32 partition. When you boot the live image, it will automatically mount the other partition in /home, providing you with persistent storage for the live image, though you will not be able to permanently install software and other components. To do that, you need to create an entire OS image on the thumb drive (also very feasible) so that you can install new software (no fat32 partition, only standard linux partitions for /, possibly /home, and swap). That can also boot on any usb-bootable system. To make it universally bootable, install a 32-bit OS image so it can run on old 32-bit hardware.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    OK Rubberman so I did what you suggested. I partition the flashdrive into 4 different partitions. 3 primary partitions with 1 linux-swap. 2 of the primaries would be for the OSes and one for a home folder to share between them. So far I have installed linux mint but when I boot the the flash drive it doesn't do anything. Thank you for the help so far.

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    The method I initially suggested would only work if you had an iso file on your hard drive or another flash drive so I think I misunderstood your situation.
    Did you do a standard full install of Mint to the flash drive? What selection did you make for the bootloader installation? What happens when you set the flash drive to first boot priority in the BIOS? Black screen, blinking cursor? What operating system do you have installed to the hard drive?

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    So it turns out that now when I boot from my hard drive I get a boot screen with the options to boot from mint or windows (with a few memory test as well).
    The problem is that when I choose mint it starts loading and then I get this error.

    Gave up waiting for root device. Common problems:
    -boot args (cat /proc/cmdline)
    -Check rootdelay= (did system wait long enough)
    -Check root= (Did the system wait for right device)
    -Missing modules (cat /proc/modules: is /dev)
    ALERT! /dev/sdc1 does not exist. Dropping to a shell!


    BuyBox v1.20.2 (Ubuntu 1:1.20.0-Bubuntu1) built-in shaell (ash)

    (initramfs) _

    Now my windows still works fine and I have verified that I installed mint on the flash drive so I am wondering why exactly I am getting this option when I am booting to my flash drive and not when i am booting from my usb.

    OK after a bit more of testing it seems that when I configured a MBR on my flash drive it effected my hard drive as well. I now get an error

    error : no such device: xxxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx
    grub rescue> _

    when ever I try and boot my system without my usb device.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    The method I initially suggested would only work if you had an iso file on your hard drive or another flash drive so I think I misunderstood your situation.
    Did you do a standard full install of Mint to the flash drive? What selection did you make for the bootloader installation? What happens when you set the flash drive to first boot priority in the BIOS? Black screen, blinking cursor? What operating system do you have installed to the hard drive?
    I have windows 7 on hard drive, I partitioned the flashdrive and did a standard install. When I boot to flashdrive I get a black screen with a blinking cursor.

    Edit: One more thing is that I cannot access my flashdrive on windows. It says I need to format it to view but I dare not do that seeing how I currently can't log onto windows without the flashdrive in at start up.
    Last edited by JaredC; 06-24-2013 at 07:36 PM.

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    The information you posted in your post # 6 above would indicate that during the installation of Mint to the flash drive, you accepted the default of device for bootloader installation which would be the mbr of the first drive. That would explain why you get the error without the usb device attached. The alert error you post above indicates it is looking for Grub files on sdc1 which would be the first partition of the the third hard drive (or flash/usb drive).

    How many drives (including flash drives) do you have? How many were attached when you installed Mint? You might go to the site below and read the directions for, download and run the bootinfoscript and post the results here. If I understand correctly, you are not able to boot either windows or Mint without the flash installed, correct?

    Boot Info Script | Free System Administration software downloads at SourceForge.net

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    I had a flashdrive with a mint live installed on it using universal usb. I booted up from that flashdrive and then used gparted to cut up my other flashdrive. I then installed mint on the other flashdrive from the one I booted up from.

    Also I am only able to boot to windows with the flashdrive and cannot boot to mint either way.

  10. #10
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    You forgot to post the output of the bootinfoscript. There are a number of possibilities I can think of that would result in the behavior you describe. Without more information, it will just be guessing. Posting the output of the script will give enough details so that someone will be able to make suggestions.

    Not being able to see the contents of the flash drive with a Linux filesystem from windows is expected behavior. A default installation of windows won't see or be able to read/write to it which why you get the message you describe, windows doesn't recognize a Linux filesystem. You would need to install third party software on windows to do that. Since you can't boot the installed Mint, you will need to use the Mint install flash and go to the site above as it is a bash script and will only run on Linux. Make sure you read the instructions. There is a link in the Description box at the site pointing to instructions.

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