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So, I'm working on this cash register system (written in C/C++) at work, when, out of nowhere, a wild idea appears: let's make it run on a linux distro instead ...
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  1. #1
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    Setting up a minimal linux distro


    So, I'm working on this cash register system (written in C/C++) at work, when, out of nowhere, a wild idea appears: let's make it run on a linux distro instead of a windows platform, it'll cut their costs by 80%.

    Now, I'm thinking a few problems might arise, so I came to ask for help:

    1) Is it worth building an extremely lightweight distro from scratch? The idea would be that it would take a few seconds to boot up, start up the program and... never die. Or is it better to use lubuntu or ArchLinux?

    2) If we build a small distro (or use an existing one), would it be easy to implement hardware support? (small printers, special displays, etc...)

    (all that would be needed would be recognition of USB ports, lan ports, a mouse, a keyboard and 2 displays)

    That's all folks!

  2. #2
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    When I had a similar concern, that is, to use a small distro to run just one program that I had written in C, I looked around to find small distros that fitted on a cd which would boot up in any computer whose BIOS was set to boot from the cd drive. That way anyone could use the program regardless of their installation. There are heaps of such small linuxes at distrowatch.com. With some you can add programs to them, but I chose to put my program on a usb which the booted up cd could work with. I'll let you do the finding. If you have a dedicated computer to run your program then you might as well get a larger more robust linux that is known to work well on servers like centos where you can add your modules and compile programs with stable software. There might be a learning curve with installing printer drivers and "special displays", but if you prepare well, often such items are in the distribution and things run very smoothly. In my case, I have always used a printer that is known to work with my linux which has made it easy.
    Last edited by avek; 06-26-2013 at 10:27 AM. Reason: more information

  3. #3
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    My main concern is the allocated memory for stuff that is never going to be used, namely the taskbar, desktop elements, and other stuff. I mean all that needs to be running is our program and nothing else, but I guess Linux has a way to disable it.

    Anyway, thank you very much!

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I suggest you use a distro that you only install what you want ... Arch, Gentoo, Debian minimal install etc. If you want command line or framebuffer only then don't install X. If you do need X then use a Window Manager rather than a Desktop Environment.

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