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Hello and thank you very much! I am running Windows 7 and I am attempting to learn bash scripting, however, I ran into a problem while following a tutorial, which ...
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    Cygwin Packages - How to add the 'nano' command?


    Hello and thank you very much!

    I am running Windows 7 and I am attempting to learn bash scripting, however, I ran into a problem while following a tutorial,
    which was the usage of a command called 'nano' (for file editing).

    One thing I want to avoid is installing every package. I am extremely confused as to how these packages are organized. I can somewhat make it out at with intuition, but it was not intuitive enough for me to find 'nano.' A formal explanation would be great. I want to be able to go myself and find things. I would much appreciative if someone would

    1) How the packages are organized
    2) Explain which packages I need for 'nano'

    So in a sense, one is the how-to and two is the example.

    EDIT: Just for more examples, I could not find 'wget' or 'apt-get' either.

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Nano explained

    RE: Explain which packages I need for 'nano'

    Running Nano under Windows 7 is not valid Linux question. If you want to run Nano under Windows maybe, you should submit this question to the Windows Forums (Windows 7 Help Forums for example)
    If you want to preserve your windows habits under linux and to run Nano under Linux open Add/Remove Software, and in the search box write: nano
    To see the help write on the Terminal: $ nano --help
    I personally edit everything with the Text Editor as common user and move the finished text file to where it should go from the terminal as root. These things like Vi,Nano etc. come a little bit to much to me.

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    Heh, Cygwin is a unix cli emulator.
    This was the most applicable forum topic 'newbie.'
    But thanks a lot. I typed in nano and found the corresponding packages.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You need to run the Cygwin installation tool and use that to install nano, assuming it is found there - ok, my work system has most of the cygwin packages installed and nano isn't there. It is just another editor. Do you REALLY need it? The gedit editor will do all it can, I expect, though I prefer nedit. In fact, I only have nedit (not nano or gedit) installed. If it isn't in the cygwin package manager, then you can download and build it from source inside the cygwin environment without much problem.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymousxyz View Post
    Heh, Cygwin is a unix cli emulator.
    This was the most applicable forum topic 'newbie.'
    But thanks a lot. I typed in nano and found the corresponding packages.
    You might be interested in emacs also - has a LOT of capabilities, and if you "enjoy" LISP programming, it can be very extensible!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    RE: This was the most applicable forum
    This is disputable.
    You are always welcome to the linux forums, but I have some philosophic problems with your topic.
    The very Linux is a Unix-like OS. Why do you need to install a Unix emulator through UNIX-like environment and command line interface for MS Windows ... under Linux? What is the general idea of all this?
    In the general case the decisive in attending a given forum is the Basic Execution Environment (in this case MS Windows). When using an emulator for MS Windows under Linux it is really a little bit difficult to say which the Basic Execution Environment actually is.
    Obviously there are levels in the software engineering that I will be never even able to start understanding.

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