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Hey everybody! I was installing raring ringtail from usb, things were going smoothly until it said it failed to install bootloader. It sucessfully installed though. I then proceded to open ...
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    Failed to install bootloader


    Hey everybody! I was installing raring ringtail from usb, things were going smoothly until it said it failed to install bootloader. It sucessfully installed though. I then proceded to open up "Try Ubuntu" to download boot-repair, but I could neither connect to wifi or ethernet. I could connect during installation though! What are my options?

    My backstory: I have been using Ubuntu for the past year, and I am familiar with it. It is just recently when I've started to really get into the command line and the nitty gritty of linux. The reason I was reinstalling ubuntu is because I started messing around with my partitions and seriously messed it up.

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    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emanmcdow View Post
    Hey everybody! I was installing raring ringtail from usb, things were going smoothly until it said it failed to install bootloader. It sucessfully installed though. I then proceded to open up "Try Ubuntu" to download boot-repair, but I could neither connect to wifi or ethernet. I could connect during installation though! What are my options?

    My backstory: I have been using Ubuntu for the past year, and I am familiar with it. It is just recently when I've started to really get into the command line and the nitty gritty of linux. The reason I was reinstalling ubuntu is because I started messing around with my partitions and seriously messed it up.
    Where were you trying to install the bootloader to, the MBR?

    Also, you're using an MBR part scheme, not EFI or uEFI or anything, right?

    As for whatever driver was allowing the internet to work during installation, try checking the additional (proprietary) drivers menu (jockey), it may not be enabled by default.

    I wouldn't worry about any boot repairs or anything, if it installed successfully it's very easy to install grub2. Google "installing GRUB2 ubuntu" - there's 1001 write-ups.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    Where were you trying to install the bootloader to, the MBR?

    Also, you're using an MBR part scheme, not EFI or uEFI or anything, right?

    As for whatever driver was allowing the internet to work during installation, try checking the additional (proprietary) drivers menu (jockey), it may not be enabled by default.

    I wouldn't worry about any boot repairs or anything, if it installed successfully it's very easy to install grub2. Google "installing GRUB2 ubuntu" - there's 1001 write-ups.
    I think I might have a corrupted disk. I'll redownload and tell you what happens. And yes I'm using a mbr scheme.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanmcdow View Post
    I think I might have a corrupted disk. I'll redownload and tell you what happens. And yes I'm using a mbr scheme.
    If you have nothing else on that disk then just have Ubuntu use the whole drive. You can go back and chop pieces off the partition later for other stuff, though do that and install the boot loader to the MBR (not the head of the partition). So if it's the first drive (sda) you'd be installing the bootloader to that, not to sda1 or sda2, etc. (actual partitions).

    Doubt it's corrupted disk.

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    Ubuntu is all I have on my computer.

    You don't think it's a corrupted disk? The last attempt to install gave me an error that said it failed to install the man-db. It crashed after that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanmcdow View Post
    Ubuntu is all I have on my computer.

    You don't think it's a corrupted disk? The last attempt to install gave me an error that said it failed to install the man-db. It crashed after that.
    Corrupted in what regard? Data can get corrupted on anything, though unless the sectors are going bad on the disk the disk itself is fine and can be fixed with a simple re-install/write. Unless you're out of spare sectors the disk can't get 'corrupted' per-se.

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    I've heard people say the copy of the ISO they downloaded got messed up some how. I really don't know, I'm just suggesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanmcdow View Post
    I've heard people say the copy of the ISO they downloaded got messed up some how. I really don't know, I'm just suggesting.
    Yeah, in that case the file just gets corrupted by the downloading browser.

    It's fortunately very easy to check if it's corrupted, though yes, even if it's corrupted it may still install fine and create issues after installation.

    Not sure why people say it's common. I've heard people say corrupted ISO downloads are common, but in the ~10 years I've been downloading/burning ISO's I've never seen a single corrupted image...so I don't know...

    But the check is easy: Most images will provide the correct MD5 hash or SHA1 hash. Then you just use a hasher and find it out.

    The only reason I think people think they see corrupted images is that like using the "md5sum" hash tool you need to use it in binary mode for the MD5 hash to match, if you use it in regular (text?) mode it'll give you a different hash, which can give you an appearingly incorrect hash.

    Though who knows, maybe corrupted downloads are all over the place and I've just never found one in the hundreds upon hundreds of ISO's I've downloaded.

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    but in the ~10 years I've been downloading/burning ISO's I've never seen a single corrupted image...so I don't know...
    Better INTERNET service in Upper New York State I guess than the deserts of West Texas where corrupted downloads are the norm.
    Wget and me are old friends as well as md5sum and sha1sum, ISP service determines whether you have good downloads. Just
    ask anybody on dialup.

    To the OP. Check rfkill and ifconfig -a and dmesg | grep firmware and lspci -nnn -k when wireless works live and compare between install and live session.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    Better INTERNET service in Upper New York State I guess than the deserts of West Texas where corrupted downloads are the norm.
    Wget and me are old friends as well as md5sum and sha1sum, ISP service determines whether you have good downloads. Just
    ask anybody on dialup.

    To the OP. Check rfkill and ifconfig -a and dmesg | grep firmware and lspci -nnn -k when wireless works live and compare between install and live session.
    Errr...you're downloading these over TCP...the packets are ordered and sequential. Also, they're checksum'ed. While it's possible to have a collision in the checksum, it's rather unlikely. Also, typically it's backed with a CRC check..

    When downloading over TCP, regardless of your internet service's packet drop stats, you shouldn't be pointing to the ISP. You typically point to the program in that case.

    Anyway, if for some reason you constantly have corrupted downloads then you shouldn't be persistently using the same downloading technique. You're best off using a service that is based around checksum. Damn near every distro worth trying has a torrent file for it and those will typically download faster than a regular HTTP download. At that point you're damn-near guaranteed that it won't have any issues. From there on it's not an ISO problem.

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