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I am not sure but i was wondering if someone can help with this question seeing how there are modules out thereo n the net for NTFS support for Redhat ...
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  1. #1
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    NTFS module & Kernel with NTFS Support


    I am not sure but i was wondering if someone can help with this question seeing how there are modules out thereo n the net for NTFS support for Redhat users like myself what is the difference between the RPM base modules and recompiling the kernel for NTFS support because right now as it stands i am able to load the external NTFS drive but i don't have access to it why is that dd i miss something in the fstab file? Here is what i added to my fstab line is this right so that all users can use the drive?

    Code:
     
    /dev/sda1               /mnt/usb                auto auto,user 1 2

  2. #2
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    Test

    To mount NTFS, try this first:
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 /mnt/usb
    By the way, I'm assuming that you are trying to mount a SCSI device here. If mount gives you an error, it's probably something to do with the support of NTFS. In this case, I'd suggest just installing the RPM module. Once you do this, you can load the module. You can also recompile the kernel with the NTFS support but if you are new to Linux, I'd suggest sticking with the RPM module. Once you get more used to everything, then you can recompile the kernel.
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    Well that is understandable i have to get more familar with Linux but i am a little curious if i get the module installed what would i need to auto mount the drive and be able to access it from any user be it me or root or any other that may exist on my system.

    I was actually thinking of splitting the drive into different partitions like one 60Gb Fat32 and the rest leave it alone so that it can be used to probably load a different distro like slackware or Debian. Is that actually possible on external drive?

  4. #4
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    Hmm, since you are new at this, I'd recommend that you stick to RedHat or Mandrake. Once you get the hang of Linux, then you might want to weigh your pros and cons. For example, while RedHat was better than Windows, I chose to move to Debian linux for automatic package dependencies (via APT). Another reason is that I find Debian more stable. This might be due to my lack of experience during the RedHat days and I see many people using RedHat without any complaints.
    The external USB drive... I think most new kernels support mass storage device via USB. Once you know that the USB drivers are loaded or builtin to the kernel, you can probably use /etc/fstab to automount that drive.
    Loading a different OS from USB might be a different story since the kernel is not loaded before you can access that drive to mount it as the root Linux device. Any opinions on this Dolda?
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    I really don't think that you can boot any OS from a USB drive, at least not without a special BIOS. Maybe some BIOSes of today are capable of using USB hard drives, but I really wouldn't bet anything on it.
    If anything, you can keep the boot partition on an IDE drive, create an initrd to load the USB modules and then keep the actual root partition on the USB hard drive. That will work, but it might be hard to set up if you're new to all this.

    To let any user mount the drive, you use the user mount option, as you appear to have done now. That won't let all users access it in the way that you might want, though. It just lets any user mount it if it isn't already. To make it accessible to all users, you must use the umask mount option, and preferrably (although not necessarily) the gid mount option. See the man page on mount (run "man 8 mount") for more info on that. The thing is, however, that those options are file system specific, so to use them, you cannot specify your file system as "auto", but you must specify it as the file system that actually is on the disk.

    As for the distro war, I don't have anything against RedHat. I'm trying it gentoo right now, and although I do find it pretty superior, it takes a very long time to install in comparison to RedHat. Personally, I think it seems quite much worth it, but I don't expect everyone to agree with me.

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    Now I see how initrd comes into role.
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    Well that is rather interesting and i will have to take a look at it in depth but i was a little curious about NTFS file system access from within Linux as well because from my understanding one can only read from a NTFS drive and not write to it. Is this true or is there a way to REad and Write to a NTFS drive?

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    No, that's true. Well, not entirely. There _is_ write support, but it will most probably trash your NTFS partition beyond recovery. Since NTFS is a closed standard, everything having to do with it has to be reverse engineered, which isn't very easy.

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    NO!!!! Do NOT ever WRITE to an NTFS partition.
    I believe in the xconfig menu, it states that this option is available as read only. Come to think of it, I'm pretty sure that it mounts as read only by default. While it's generally OK to read from such a partition, writing would cause devestation to that partition. I've even read that mounting NTFS is a bad idea but I haven't had any bad experiences or have heard actual stories about it.
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  10. #10
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    Actually, it works so that you have to compile write support explicitly. Normally, NTFS is compiled without write support altogether, so even if you would want to mount it read/write, you wouldn't be able to without recompiling the NTFS module with write support. And to even enable write support to be enabled for compiling, you must first explicitly select that you want to see experimental features.

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