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Originally Posted by kaze I ran into way too many problems with using obscure hardware for which linux drivers weren't available This is not true. The kernel can be patched ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaze View Post
    I ran into way too many problems with using obscure hardware for which linux drivers weren't available
    This is not true. The kernel can be patched with almost all of the 'obscure drivers', so far you are able to identify and find what do you need (at the OEM page for example).
    Of course if one does not know the adapter of the wireless, the driver becomes obscure, but it is not because the driver is not available on the market, but rather because one does not know what exactly he is looking for. Actually this is not obscure hardware - it is sooner 'double blind' search.
    Besides there are some universal drivers that can quite successfully replace the specific ones.
    Twice in my 'linux career' I needed to install OEM drivers - the first time it was HP printer, and the second time - audio surround drivers. In both of the cases I downloaded the linux drivers form the OEM web page and patched the kernel ... without any problems.

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    Go for DELL

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    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grahamj80 View Post
    Go for DELL
    Why? Explain yourself.
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  4. #14
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by user-f11 View Post
    This is not true. The kernel can be patched with almost all of the 'obscure drivers', so far you are able to identify and find what do you need (at the OEM page for example).
    Of course if one does not know the adapter of the wireless, the driver becomes obscure, but it is not because the driver is not available on the market, but rather because one does not know what exactly he is looking for. Actually this is not obscure hardware - it is sooner 'double blind' search.
    Besides there are some universal drivers that can quite successfully replace the specific ones.
    Twice in my 'linux career' I needed to install OEM drivers - the first time it was HP printer, and the second time - audio surround drivers. In both of the cases I downloaded the linux drivers form the OEM web page and patched the kernel ... without any problems.
    You can easily find out the manufacturer and device ids in Linux using the lspci or lsusb commands. Then, you can go to sites like wireless.kernel.org to find the drivers, firmware, and installation instructions for just about any WiFi or Bluetooth device out there.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #15
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    As for Dell, I have a Dell laptop, which uses a Broadcom WiFi chip set. I had to go to wireless.kernel.org and found that Broadcom now has Linux drivers and firmware, as well as simple-to-install instructions. Works a treat. However, this was not always the case...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #16
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Hewlett-Packard and Dell as of this afternoon were still advertising laptops with the Sandy Bridge processor--despite the fact that Intel has halted shipment of Sandy Bridge's accompanying chipset due to a flaw. Today, Dell issued this statement. "Dell and Intel are in communication regarding the design issue in the recently released Intel 6 Series (Sandy Bridge) support chip, code-name Cougar Point. This affects four currently available Dell products, the XPS 8300, the Vostro 460, the Alienware M17x R.3 and the Alienware Aurora R.3, as well as several other planned products including XPS 17 with 3D. We're committed to addressing this with customers who have already purchased one of the four products and will provide further details on this as it becomes available," Dell said.
    That is from a 2011 article and one should be aware of these things when buying used I think.

    Besides Battery problems, heat issues with certain model numbers still in the wild and the broadcom thing. I dodge Dells like if they had leprosy. That was why I wished more of a better explanation than a 3 word

    Go for Dell
    without no other info on why. You know I respect you bro, but I am just trying to coax new Members to give a concise post rather than just a fanboy yell.

    Like a model number or something that is a known good model. You know what I mean.
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