Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
I'm normally quite computer literate. I have tried linux over and over again, over 20 different times in the past few years, even the supposed simplist ones like zorin os, ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    5

    Why does 99% of everything in linux require the terminal?


    I'm normally quite computer literate. I have tried linux over and over again, over 20 different times in the past few years, even the supposed simplist ones like zorin os, linux mint, ubuntu, pclinux, etc.

    I really want to like linux, I think it has great potential, but I just get so frustrated and give up due to some of the things that are ridiculously complicated.

    Why is it 99% of everything requires configuring in the terminal?

    I download programs from synaptic which in the beginning is easy, but they just get installed to bizarre places, no icon or any way to find them. Have to resort to online tuturials and terminal commands just to locate and figure out how to run them (some I still can't run, even though they are installed, simply can't find them).

    So many times you try to install the simplest little program, you have to find a tutorial with 15 terminal commands you must perform just to get it to work.

    In fact, try to lookup how to do almost anything at all in linux, and 99% of the time you find page after page of terminal commands.

    Why can't software simply install into a program files folder like windows, and have a nice, easy to find icon? Why can't all the terminal configuring be done in a configuration settings gui?

    Linux has the potential to be so great, till the tiniest simplest little thing is nearly impossible to do without googling for hours, finding conflicting terminal commands, and trial and error.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    Why is it 99% of everything requires configuring in the terminal?
    It doesn't, paticularly with the most recent major distributions. I know PCLinux and some other distributions use Synaptic but many don't. If you install a program you can usually find it with the whereis command. For a program named myprogram you would simply type whereis myprogram in a terminal. Executable programs are usually in the /usr/bin or /bin directories. If you are looking at tutorials online, the first thing you need to do is make sure it is for the same distribution you are using, the second thing is the date. If it's ten years old, ignore it. Without a specific example, there is not much else anyone can tell you.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    If you install a program you can usually find it with the whereis command. For a program named myprogram you would simply type whereis myprogram in a terminal. Executable programs are usually in the /usr/bin or /bin directories.
    Thanks for the reply. Its pretty much just proving my question though.

    Almost everything in linux resorts to using the terminal. Why are programs so hidden that I have to break out the terminal and use memorized commands to find them? Theres a program I installed lately, which I found the directories its installed in, yet can't find any way to run it.

    Why would it be so ridiculous like that? Why doesn't each installed program simply have an desktop or icon like windows or android?

    And why don't they all simply have a settings menu in their gui to make any configuration, with simple button clicks in english, rather than relying on obscure memorized terminal commands which must be done with the perfect flags, syntax, etc?

    Seems the answer to 99% of every question in linux, the answer is open the terminal and type in all these obscure commands. Why? Everything in windows can be done without ever touching the command prompt.

  4. #4
    Just Joined! rajagenupula's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27
    CLI faster than GUI . So every one gonna like that to do complex task.

    Sent from my Xperia J using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie nihili's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    188
    because first there was the terminal, then came the gui.
    because every gui has be coded by someone, and for some tasks it's just not worth the effort (but if it's so important to you, just start coding it yourself).
    because many of the examples above actually have a gui solution, you just don't know it.
    because everybody who uses their computer a lot uses the keyboard much more than the mouse anyway.
    because nobody is trying to sell you anything - priorities are different.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,305
    Quote Originally Posted by mxmaniac View Post
    Thanks for the reply. Its pretty much just proving my question though.

    Almost everything in linux resorts to using the terminal. Why are programs so hidden that I have to break out the terminal and use memorized commands to find them? Theres a program I installed lately, which I found the directories its installed in, yet can't find any way to run it.

    Why would it be so ridiculous like that? Why doesn't each installed program simply have an desktop or icon like windows or android?

    And why don't they all simply have a settings menu in their gui to make any configuration, with simple button clicks in english, rather than relying on obscure memorized terminal commands which must be done with the perfect flags, syntax, etc?

    Seems the answer to 99% of every question in linux, the answer is open the terminal and type in all these obscure commands. Why? Everything in windows can be done without ever touching the command prompt.
    Your claims for both types of operating systems is simply not true. Your comments actually reflect that you don't require much from your operating system and whatever windows variant youo are using will do it for you. There has been some effort at times to produce a dumbed down linux but one of the issues with it is that most of the people using Linux variants are either power users, for example programmers, or the computers are being used in enterprise installs where they aren't being used as desktop computers at all. Such users have no use for a dumbed down interface - or if they want one they use OSX. On the other hand most power users find the mess that is the windows variants unpalatable. Yes, there are power users of that os type but generally the os has been cobbled together to answer the needs of users like yourself. There are patterns to how installations occur and they do vary somewhat from distro to distro but not that much. It is based on the UNIX way, if you like, and for those of us familiar with it it is effective.

    Linux isn't for everybody. You don't have to use the command line but you do have to make the effort to find the correct tools for the way you would like to work with the system. Linux systems generally offer a lot of choice in how you use them and how you set them up. If the distro you are using doesn't provide that choice you can make changes to it or use another distro that does.

    If the answer you are getting 99% of the time is open a terminal and type something it is most likely because the people giving the answer like that way of working. Since it is a UNIX based system t is relatively easy to add a GUI to any command you should deem needs one - it may already exist - and there is nothing to stop you from producing one.

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    5
    I do understand how the CLI can be quicker "if" you have the exact syntax memorized for repetitive tasks you do often. But it requires so much experience and memorization of not only tons of commands and syntax, but also all the additional flags or modifiers, etc.

    I just don't see how it is intuitive at all for general use, take this example. A brand new piece of software never used, how do you know all the syntax/commands/modifiers, etc? You type "man" and "help" commands, and read pages of text figure things out? Read online guides so someone else tells you the pages of commands to use? Wouldn't even a power user prefer to just have an icon they can double click, and it opens up a GUI where all the settings are listed in plain english, and a few mouse clicks is all it takes to configure everything?

    Same with finding programs. Even though a power user may know all the terminal commands to do so, wouldn't they still prefer to have a simple menu or desktop icon be standard, so they don't even have to do that terminal routine unless they feel a desire to do extra steps. The pre-installed software in distros are generally neatly organized with icons in a menu, so why isn't newly installed software?

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,305
    There are a lot of different flavours of Linux. Some of them will do what you're describing and have at worst no more learning curve the MS products. They aren't MS however so you will have to learn the GUI tools to use. However, learning a few simple CLI commands is a pretty simple thing and if you do anything with computers more involved then surfing the web they can be a big help. If your only interest in Linux is to use free software then pick a distro that makes it easy. Something lik this maybe: http://pinguyos.com/

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie nihili's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    188
    mouse vs. keyboard
    best example: right now, i'm typing this. if i want to check out something from the terminal, i use the win+t keycombo to open a terminal, type in the command, press enter, take a look at what i want to see, and press alt+f4 to close the terminal again, then continue typing to you.
    for me this is much easier than: taking one hand off the keyboard, reach for the mouse, click some menu button, look for the application that does what i want, click again to open it, navigate to the menu bar, click some commands, navigate to the upper right corner of the window, press the little button to close the window, take my hand off the mouse and continue typing.

    just an example.

    keybinds:
    ctrl+o opens a file
    ctrl+s saves
    ctrl+a selects all
    ctrl+c copies
    ctrl+v pastes
    these are very basic and practically global (yes, in windows, too) keyboard shortcuts. no software developer in their right minds would change that.

    if someone had been using linux all the time and would then be asked to use windows, i guess they'd have quite similar complaints.
    it's just a question of what you have been memorizing all the time.

    Linux is NOT Windows

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,218
    You ask how cli can be quicker than gui? I don't know about tasks in general but it's certainly miles quicker for file management. I haven't used a graphical file manager for months, because I simply got too fed up with the time it took to find files in large folders like /usr/share/doc.

    The reason why installed programs don't automatically put icons on your desktop is that it would be considered rude of them. Your desktop belongs to you; you decide what goes on it. It's quite easy on most desktops to put icons up yourself for your favourite programs (just right-click). And new programs do, in most distros, go automatically into the desktop menu, so that you can run them from there without knowing their exact location.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •