Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 2 of 2
Hello I recently bought this Centos 5.10 VPS. They already gave me pre-configured everything : ====== php -v PHP 5.3.22 (cli) (built: Apr 2 2013 15:04:13) Copyright (c) 1997-2013 The ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    6

    VPS webserver speed


    Hello

    I recently bought this Centos 5.10 VPS.

    They already gave me pre-configured everything :

    ======
    php -v
    PHP 5.3.22 (cli) (built: Apr 2 2013 15:04:13)
    Copyright (c) 1997-2013 The PHP Group
    Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2013 Zend Technologies
    with the ionCube PHP Loader v4.4.1, Copyright (c) 2002-2013, by ionCube Ltd., and
    with Zend Guard Loader v3.3, Copyright (c) 1998-2010, by Zend Technologies
    ======

    But I still feel like my blogs/shopping cart sites loading very slow.

    I would like to clarify few things

    1) I'm using Apache, should I upgrade my web server? ( I do not wish to go for high end expensive webservers)

    2) Should I upgrade my PHP version?

    3) Should I install any cache plugins? xcache/APC?

    It would be great if someone guide guide me what are the modules/plugins/upgrades can improve my webserver speed.

    Thank you in advance
    John

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    889
    1) Apache works great. It's perfectly fine for just about anything, it's not slow. You should consult Apache Performance Tuning - Apache HTTP Server if you're in doubt about Apache's config. There are also settings like "AllowOverrides" and similar settings that can be disabled to reduce page processing times.

    2) You should use the most recent version of PHP supported by your application. Since you're using CentOS 5, which use upstream Red Hat binaries, your php version should be fine (ie, it gets security updates). Often times newer versions of software have performance improvements, but it's not often you'll see dramatic performance increases with smaller sites. Any supported PHP 5.x should be just fine.

    3) Depends on your application and your usage. For a relatively small site or sites, you should give more memory to your database, before you give memory to PHP caching. If your applications use large frameworks such as Zend (mentioned as a plugin above), APC may dramatically improve performance.

    I'm going to assume you're using MySQL. The default memory config for MySQL is very conservative. Consider giving it more memory.

    Lastly, some blog/shopping cart software are just really slow. Each respective software package will have different parameters you can set to hopefully improve performance. Your best bet will be to check those software's forums and wiki's.

    At the end of the day, you'll have to put in the hours testing to figure out what works best for your situation. Also consider something like tools.pingdom.net. It will give you a performance breakdown from the client end to help diagnose any DNS or similar problems.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •