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Help! I could cry with frustration. I am trying to install Linux Mint on my Toshiba Satelite A30, Pentium (R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz, 448 MB Of RAM. Presently running Windows ...
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  1. #1
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    I need some SERIOUS help!


    Help! I could cry with frustration.

    I am trying to install Linux Mint on my Toshiba Satelite A30, Pentium (R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz, 448 MB Of RAM. Presently running Windows XP Home.

    I downloaded the linuxmint-16-cinnamon-dvd-32bit .ISO

    Then I downloaded a free ISO burning program called InfraRecorder and installed it. I'm using a Tesco DVD-R 8x 4.7GB disc.

    It didn't work.

    So I installed Terrabyte CDCC

    That didn't work, either.

    So I tried Free ISO Burner next

    Guess what? That didn't work either.

    So I tried shouting at it and doing a little dance.

    Unsurprisingly, that didn't didn't work either.

    Other than pouring petrol on this computer and throwing a match on it... how do I MAKE IT BURN?

    (I can see Linux is going to be a whole lot of fun...)

  2. #2
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Your problems are with Windows programs, not with Linux. I haven't bothered with Windows in general, and especially XP, in years, so I'm not sure what DVD creation programs to recommend. However, giving us more information than "it didn't work" might help. "Didn't worik" covers a LOT of territory, and we have no idea what you tried, nor how you did it.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Windows has a burner built in, not fancy and can be cantankerous, but I've used when at remote sites.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...om-an-iso-file
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  4. #4
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    448 MB Of RAM.
    I'd forget about that unless Mint has a spinoff with Fluxbox or Icewm.

    You sound like a AntiX candidate to me.
    Or Crunchbang, Slitaz, or Carolina 1.2.

    Youtube is your friend for watching reviews, doing md5sum in Windows, Burning Linux Images in Windows.
    Use it.
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  5. #5
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ditto with what rokytnji said. 448MB of RAM isn't very much. At the very best I'd be looking at something wit xfce like SolydX to run on your machine. I've got SolydX running on my grandkids desktop computer, it's an older Dell L866r with a Pentium III 866MHz single core, 512MB or RAM and the old hard drive out of my iMac which is 60GB.

    If you can download Brasero Disc burning software that'd be your best option as it has worked for me in the past. Use the bottom option "Burn Image" to burn the .iso to the disc and it'll work like a charm. You didn't say weather or not you can boot to a USB stick. If you can then UNetbootin would be a great option if you have a 4GB or larger USB stick to put the .iso onto.

    Either way I'm sure you can get this working and also, while you're at it go into your BIOS and make sure to set your boot order so you'll hit the USB or CD/DVD drive before the internal hard drive, that'll make it easier to boot into your .iso once you get it burned to a CD/DVD.
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  6. #6
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    InfraRecorder is a good burning app, I've used and recommended it for years.

    Problem could be the media (glitched DVDs). Could be something wrong with the ISO you downloaded. Could be the Tesco hardware. Could be the burn speed... InfraRecorder burn should be set to the slowest setting (1x).

    As mentioned, "Didn't work" isn't enough info for anyone to help you.

    As mentioned, the bigger problem is the 448MB of ram because it's not enough for Mint.

    Welcome to the forums!

  7. #7
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    As others before me have said, it's a hardware issue, first.
    Want to run Mint? Up the RAM to the motherboard's max -- 2GB !
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  8. #8
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    Did you select burn Image or did you just copy it to a cd?

  9. #9
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    I'm not sure how to be more specific about what didn't work. It would not burn the DVD. On the first program, the "Okay" button and most of the options were greyed out. On the second, I got some kind of error and on the third, it was aborted. Bottom line is, I click on 'Burn' - no burn occurs.

    I am not just trying to copy to the CD but burn an image of the ISO so it works as a bootable CD. Hence the reason I am using this software and not just dragging it to the D: drive in Windows.

    Thanks for the heads up on 448MB RAM not being enough to run Mint. No one in any other forum has raised this as an issue so far, despite me always posting up my machine specs before asking any question. As you'll always see me do. Since I currently run Windows XP and Photoshop 7, Firefox and Microsoft Office on this configuration, without any major memory issues it has never once occurred to me that 448MB would be insufficient to run Linux. I was led to believe all along, that Linux Mint was good for older computers. Evidently, someone is/ was wrong.

    Since reading the posts here, I've taken the advice of reading about and watching YouTube videos on Anti-X and am now wondering what advantage this may give me, over Windows XP currently running in this machine, other than not needing any anti-virus software flapping away in the background. I do not use Antivirus with XP for a couple of important reasons - ranging from unfeasibly slow performance to my own utter defiance of an ugly and malicious side of the internet.

    To 'nuts and bolts', my question is, in Anti-X, will I be able to run GIMP Image Manipulation software and an efficient office, such as Libre?

    I am attracted to the perceived 'ease of setup' described in the introduction and I am attracted to reviews claiming fast performance with the browser, ready availability of codecs for Flash video and Youtube plus having a bit of RAM to spare. Sounds nice. With this, I aim also to engorge my lower sensibilities with videos and graphic images depicting the lower end of human depravity.

    My reasons for switching to Linux is my poor attitude towards Microsoft's fine, upstanding policy of "upgrade or die" and because I can afford neither better hardware than this old thing nor the price of Windows 7 or 8. I am trading in the power and beauty of Adobe Photoshop for a system which does not need anti-virus (which I refuse to install on principle) and a learning curve into free open source software which I hope will be rewarding. In addition to this older laptop, I also have a Sony Vaio Dual Core with a couple of gig, which is currently under repair. Maybe we will try Mint on that?

    I am currently unable to boot from USB due to this machine's BIOS being password protected, which prevents me from changing the boot order. I know the answer but am unable to locate J7 or the BIOS battery, which I'm told is situated beneath the memory slots. It has been like this since I bought it many years ago, without my knowledge. I'm in touch with the original seller and he doesn't have the password either. The boot priority list (which I can access) does not appear to have any effect on this. So CD/DVD booting seems the only way forward at this juncture.

    And yes, I realise my current problems are to do with Windows, not Linux. Hence my efforts...

    I think that's covered most of the questions put to me.

    If I think of anything else, I'll post again. Many thanks for the warm welcome and the sage advice.
    Last edited by Totally_Kai-Bosched; 04-13-2014 at 02:54 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Totally_Kai-Bosched
    in Anti-X, will I be able to run GIMP Image Manipulation software and an efficient office, such as Libre?
    Yes, you will.

    Quote Originally Posted by Totally_Kai-Bosched
    I was led to believe all along, that Linux Mint was good for older computers. Evidently, someone is/ was wrong.
    Might have been true years ago but not any more. AntiX is a good choice among a number of distros geared toward older computers, and which use a lot less ram than Mint.

    Quote Originally Posted by Totally_Kai-Bosched
    I am currently unable to boot from USB due to this machine's BIOS being password protected
    Dunno which but there's usually a key (F1-F12, Esc) which brings up a list to select which media to boot.

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