Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Hello everybody this is my first post in this forum. I would very much appreciate if you can share with me some of your knowledge. The situation is the following. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    4

    How to connect a camera to a Linux System


    Hello everybody this is my first post in this forum. I would very much appreciate if you can share with me some of your knowledge.

    The situation is the following. In windows (I suppose many of us came from there) when I want to use a USB camera, I connect it to the USB port and usually it is automatically recognized. In the worst of cases I have to download and install some DLL to make it work.

    How does this works in the following cases:

    1) In Linux. I heard the equivalent of a DLL is a so file. How does this work here? Is there automatic recognition?

    2) In Linux for a non-intel architecture. Say an ARM system running linux.

    How can I use a USB camera on these cases? Or if anything what do I have to ask the vendor of the camera for it to work?

    Thank you very much for reading my post and thanks a thousand in advance for any advice you can give me

    Regards

    Kansai

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Woodshed, CA
    Posts
    949
    In Linux first piece of information required to get help is knowing what Linux distro you're using. From there general hardware info is good. With that then you and others can search for information like below is a link on setting up a webcab on Ubuntu.

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Webcam

    Also be aware in Windows DLL's aren't always libraries, they can be executable code and some of the windows own executable's have DLL extensions. In Linux as .SO is a shared object/library and most the time the package installer for a program will handle installation for you.

    So post back with more information and people will be able to help you.
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    994
    You can download Cheese to test your camera. Logitech USB cameras normally are recognized by most Linux Distros but I can't speak for other brands.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,649
    My Nikon D-SLR is automatically recognised when plugged in by every distribution I have used. Without knowing the brand of camera it's hard to be more specific.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baja Oklahoma
    Posts
    507
    I haven't seen a case where a USB camera wasn't recognized. AFAIK that's part of the kernel, and no other library is necessary, unless required by the manufacturer to gain extra functionality. In that case, you would need to get the software from the manufacturer. But I've never had such a need. Webcams just work.

  7. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    4
    Thank you very much for your response. The machine I am using is a ARM Cortex-A9
    The linux distribution running there is modification of uClinux.
    There is a USB device port and a USB Host port, I am guessing I will need to use the USB Host Port to connect the camera (a device)

    The camera I want to try are actually several. One is a logitec one, other ones are Buffalo and another one is a OSTEC (Taiwan maker) one. I am also considering a BASLER camera but I am not really sure I can do that (for the interface they support-so far only tried Gige on my PC)

    Anyway, I am going to do some experiments here and report back, in the meantime if there is something you can guide me on, I will appreciate it very much..

    Thanks a thousand in advance
    Kansai

  8. #7
    Just Joined! Rava's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    hacking 127.0.0.1
    Posts
    50
    So far, all cameras I used on several Linux distros have been recognized as external USB drive. usually Linux let's you read and write on such a device, so do know that by moving or deleting you might damage important data from the camera memory card, and you could also delete photos or videos even if you don't want to...

    So, please be aware of that!

  9. #8
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,649
    Quote Originally Posted by Rava View Post
    So far, all cameras I used on several Linux distros have been recognized as external USB drive. usually Linux let's you read and write on such a device, so do know that by moving or deleting you might damage important data from the camera memory card, and you could also delete photos or videos even if you don't want to...

    So, please be aware of that!
    That's a good point. It's one of the things I am so used to that I didn't even think to mention it.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  10. #9
    Just Joined! Rava's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    hacking 127.0.0.1
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    That's a good point. It's one of the things I am so used to that I didn't even think to mention it.
    Me, too, but I try to warp my thinking down so that I can better teach beginners some ropes, cause, you know, us IT people can speak in our own lingo and beginner only hear unknown words en mass and get near to nothing at times...

  11. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    4
    Thank you very much for all the advice.
    Some other work has prevented me from doing more on this stuff but the other day I connected the camera and got the following message

    Code:
    usb 1-1.2: new high-speed USB device number 4 using rmobile-ehci-driver
    so I guess the camera got recognized?

    Now how can I check it out?
    My situation is a bit complicated, please let me explain.

    This ARM running uCLinux is connected to my PC running Debian linux.
    My PC of course have graphical output but I send commands to the ARM only through a terminal. So I dont think there can be any normal window response.

    Anyway, normally if I run **from my computer** guvcview I can see the camera originally attached to the ARM. (/dev/video0 I guess)

    I am now trying to do the same for the other camera (the one connected to the USB) but guvcview doesnt recognize any other camera...

    Any ideas on this?

    Thanks a thousand

    Kansai

    P.S> By the way this "/dev/video0" that guvcview recognize, is the one from the PC devian? or the one on the ARM uCLinux?? kinda confused here.....

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •