Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1

    How do I log in "as root"?


    Hello, I was here a while ago asking about installing Linux, but life happened and I've only just gt around to installing it!

    I need to change the mouse pointer, and I've found instructions for doing that and downloaded a new set of pointers that I can get along with. But I need to put it in the /usr/share/icons directory before I can install it, and it seems that I cannot do this unless I am logged in "as root".

    How do I do this? The login screen only shows one user account, the one I created at the start, and this is apparently not "root". I expect it's probably very simple if only I knew how to do it! The version I'm using is Zorin 9 Core, by the way.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Acadiana
    Posts
    1,909
    Open a terminal and type
    Code:
    su -
    give root password. Or type
    Code:
    sudo -i
    and type your user password. Which one works depends on distro and setup.

    Note: root does not run GUI, this is a safety rule and good practice.

  3. #3
    Worked like magic, thanks. Now have mouse pointers fixed (and have picked up my first few words of UNIX in the process! I used to kind of speak DOS but it's a long time since I've needed to, and this is different anyway. But I learn that kind of thing fast). I'll already say one thing for Zorin, it's fast! Cettainly loads fast. I'm given to understand that Zorin's in fact pretty bulky for Linux, but compared to Windows Vista - !

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    you could have put the files in ~/.local/share/icons or ~/.icons
    - that wouldn't have required root privileges.
    but +1 for making it work!
    I am not a "Linux Guru"! Get off me! The Forum software won't let me change it!
    How to ask smart questions | Don't be a Help Vampire | How to Use Code Tags
    You can post a link by removing "http://www." from it.

  6. #5
    Oh, fair enough, I didn't know that, all I had was this set of instructions off the Zorin user forum, which might as well have been magic spells to me - all I knew was, it said do this. I got slightly lost in the command line in the process of doing it, though, and had to fish about in the help screen to try and find out what went wrong, so I now have more idea what all the magic spells meant!

    So /local is a directory you can mess about with without doing the special permsiions thing? That's good to know, I'm going to have ot get used to which bits are open and which aren't. Considering what a big deal Linux makes of being all about tinketing with stuff, an awffu;l lot of the important parts of the hard disk seem to have padlocks on them. Is Linux so fussy about trustworthy and untrustworthy users because UNIX started by being mainly about network servers, rather than desktops where you could expect that the "user" would normally be the person the computer belonged to? Random speculation from someone who really understands nothing about user accounts or network servers besides knowing what they are.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Acadiana
    Posts
    1,909
    Not /local, but ~/.local, there is a huge difference. In UNIX systems system wide settings go to /etc and user customizations go yo users home directory.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •