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Hi, I was wondering about the pros and cons of using xinetd. I am not sure if I understand it correctly but I believe it is used to start services. ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User Allblack's Avatar
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    Understanding Xinetd


    Hi,

    I was wondering about the pros and cons of using xinetd. I am not sure if I understand it correctly but I believe it is used to start services. Why would I use xinetd instead of runlevels? Are runlevels limited to a select choice of services?

    For example, I want to start telnet and ftp on my red hat box. I did not see an option under the runlevels. Does this mean that xinetd,inetd or a startup script is my only option.

    I have been told once that you are better off not using inetd(this was related to Freebsd). I had a look at the man pages and xinetd.org but it is not totally clear yet

    cheers

  2. #2
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    You've got it all the wrong way. Xinetd isn't really related to services in that way.
    This is what xinetd does: It listens to ports, and when a connection comes in, it starts the actual daemon that handles the protocol and passes the network socket to it. The alternative is having a listening daemon for each of these protocols, ie. one daemon for telnet, one for ftp, one for pop3, one for rdate, etc. Xinetd provides a way to only have one process running to listen for connections. There are no cons of using it.

  3. #3
    Linux User Allblack's Avatar
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    Thanks Dolda,

    So this is not using any resources until someone asks for the services. For example, sshd is enabled to start at boot time. I don't think it will use much resources but why is it that a daemon like sshd or any other one does not use xinetd instead.
    I guess this might be a useless question, I would just like to know the reasoning behind it.

  4. #4
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    For an explanation of why sshd doesn't use inetd or xinetd, see the sshd manpage and look up the -i option.

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