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Hi, I have been looking at how to edit the grub file on my dual boot WinXP and Suse lapper, and have learnt what to do to the grub. The ...
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  1. #1
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    Editing the Grub?


    Hi,
    I have been looking at how to edit the grub file on my dual boot WinXP and Suse lapper, and have learnt what to do to the grub.

    The question is how do I open the file to access it (e.g In Windows I would use notebook etc)

    Thank you in advance

    Radders

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    You could use any number of text editors in Suse. For the command line, I would recommend installing pico or nano...you run them by typing (for example) nano <filename>. As far as graphical editors go, kwrite and kate are pretty good.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

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  3. #3
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    You need to open your file as root, in a text editor, i'd use vim in the command line:
    Code:
    su
    &#91;rootpass&#93;
    vim /boot/grub/menu.lst
    then press the i key and edit what you want, then press :w! to save, and :q to quit vim.

    dylunio
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  4. #4
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    Aaahhh, vi...so intuitive
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  5. #5
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    first, open a console, type su<ENTER>, your root password
    cd to /boot/grub
    type vi, or whatever your favorite text editor is, and the file name
    Code:
    vi menu.lst
    That is how I do it on my SUSE/XP machine

    After the file is opened in vi, hit "i", this will bring you to the insert mode.
    Edit it how you want, hit <ESC>, type ZZ, and you are done.

    hope this helps.
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  6. #6
    Linux Engineer spencerf's Avatar
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    you can also use less <filename> if you just want to view it without accidently changing something and saving it and screwing stuff up!!!

    I know on FC3 emacs <filename> works, not sure about suze though.
    All right, brain. You don't like me and I don't like you, but let's just do this and I can get back to killing you with beer. All New Users Read This!!! If you have a grub problem please look at GRUB MANUAL

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer spencerf's Avatar
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    you can also use less <filename> if you just want to view it without accidently changing something and saving it and screwing stuff up!!!

    I know on FC3 emacs <filename> works, not sure about suze though.
    All right, brain. You don't like me and I don't like you, but let's just do this and I can get back to killing you with beer. All New Users Read This!!! If you have a grub problem please look at GRUB MANUAL

  8. #8
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    Aaahhh, vi...so intuitive
    it's the only command line editor that makes sense to me, it was the first I learnt, and I still use it to this day.
    Registered Linux User #371543!
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    /dev/null2

  9. #9
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    Seems like pretty much everyone sticks with their first cli editor. I usually recommend nano to noobs because it lists the commands at the bottom of the screen, which is pretty handy.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  10. #10
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    Thank you very much. I shall try when it when I get back.
    Stay on standby to help the newbie

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