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Is there a program like windows explorer? I can't figure out how to view files on my second hard drive....
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  1. #1
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    How do I access my second hard drive?


    Is there a program like windows explorer? I can't figure out how to view files on my second hard drive.

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast puntmuts's Avatar
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    There are several programs like Explorer. But if you do not post more info we can't really help you.
    I\'m so tired .....
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    Like which version of which distribution are you using? If there was an option, which desktop environment (usually KDE or Gnome)? Also if you could please post the contents of the file /etc/fstab.
    Michael Salivar

    Man knows himself insofar as he knows the world, becoming aware of it only in himself, and of himself only within it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by puntmuts
    There are several programs like Explorer. But if you do not post more info we can't really help you.
    I'm using Fedora, what else would you like to know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethyriel
    Like which version of which distribution are you using? If there was an option, which desktop environment (usually KDE or Gnome)? Also if you could please post the contents of the file /etc/fstab.
    Fedora, not sure how to tell which version or desktop environment. When I try to pull up /etc/fstab with the file browser it opens for a split second then closes the window

    *edit*
    actually I fould the /etc folder, but there doesnt seem to be a fstab folder in it

    and I think i'm using gnome

  6. #6
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    How do you view files on your first hard drive? Whatever program you use will likely work for the other one provided that the drive is mounted properly, which is why it's helpful to know what's in /etc/fstab.
    \"Nifty News Fifty: When news breaks, we give you the pieces.\" - Sluggy Freelance

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    Quote Originally Posted by Workaphobia
    How do you view files on your first hard drive? Whatever program you use will likely work for the other one provided that the drive is mounted properly, which is why it's helpful to know what's in /etc/fstab.
    File browser under applications seems to be the obvious choice, but I cant get to the first hard drive either.

  8. #8
    Linux Enthusiast puntmuts's Avatar
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    What are you looking for? A drive called C: or D: ? They do not exist in Linux. C: is /dev/hda D: could be /dev/hdb.

    Please read the sticky topic in this forum: http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/topic-6572.html .
    I\'m so tired .....
    #200472

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    Quote Originally Posted by puntmuts
    What are you looking for? A drive called C: or D: ? They do not exist in Linux. C: is /dev/hda D: could be /dev/hdb.

    Please read the sticky topic in this forum: http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/topic-6572.html .
    applications/system tools/hardware browser shows my installed hard drives are /dev/hda, dev/hdb, and dev/hdd. but i dont know how to view whats on them

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    First, your first IDE drive will be /dev/hda, the second will be /dev/hdb, etc...

    Each partition is then given a number after the name. /dev/hda1 would be the first partition on the first IDE disk, for example.

    Lets say, hypothetically, that you have two partitions on /dev/hda, and one partition on /dev/hdb.

    On windows:
    /dev/hda1 = C:
    /dev/hda2 = D:
    /dev/hdb1 = E:
    and so on. Well, sometimes not, but usually the drives are lettered that way.

    Not every partition will have files on it, at least one should be swap space.

    In order to access files on a hard drive, you will need to mount it on the filesystem tree(or use a program to directly access it, but I won't get into that).

    Here is an example of how filesystems might be mounted on some Linux box:
    /dev/hda1 on /
    /dev/hda2 on /usr
    /dev/hda3 on /boot
    /dev/hda4 on /var/log
    /dev/hda5 as swap
    /dev/hdb1 on /home
    /dev/hdc1 on /var/www/htdocs
    /dev/hdd1 on /mnt/extra_storage

    To access, say, /dev/hdb1, you would then go to /home. Everything under /home is actually on the second hard drive.

    To manually mount a drive, you use the command:
    %mount <partitiondevice> <mountpoint>

    For example, if you wanted to mount the first partition on the second IDE hard drive on /mnt/hdb, you would do:
    %mount /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb

    To unmount a device, you do:
    %umount <partitiondevice>
    or
    %umount <mountpoint>

    To view mounted filesystems, do:
    %mount

    The mountpoint must also be an existing directory.

    To do what you want to do:
    %mkdir /mnt/hdb
    %mount /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb

    /mnt/hdb is now actually the root of the second hard drive's first partition.

    The /etc/fstab is a list of the device, mountpoint, and options for various filesystems. It allows them to be mounted automatically at boot or be easier to manually mount. You will probably want to add the second hard drive to it, but it is not necessary.

    One other note, sometimes the partition numbers may jump. You may have an hda1 and hda5, for example, but no hda2, hda3, and hda4.

    It is more complicated than the C: D: E: etc... of Windows, but it has a lot of advantages over that too.

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