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Hi all, Just managed to get Linux (RH 8.0) installed on my notebook. Now I am facing some issues and I am wondering whether anyone has gone through this before ...
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  1. #1
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    Newbie Q: Any way to speed up eth0 when not on network?


    Hi all,

    Just managed to get Linux (RH 8.0) installed on my notebook. Now I am facing some issues and I am wondering whether anyone has gone through this before and managed to find an elegant solution to the problem.

    I noticed that when configuring the IP address, if you choose DHCP, and if the notebook is not connected to any network, the booting process takes a long time (due to the initialization of the eth0 device). If I configure a static IP address, then there's no problem. However, I would not like to configure a static ip address as my office network uses DHCP. Is there any way I can configure the IP addressing to use DHCP but when the machine is not connected to any network, to have a quicker bootup process?

  2. #2
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    hit "I" for "Interactive Bootup" then cancel it from starting up, then continue on from there. That is the only way I can think of doing it. I wonder if there is a control code to see if there is a network cable plugged in to the blasted thing? That might be neat to see.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  3. #3
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    Most network cards seem to have support for that, since windows 2000 and later can do that (checking for cable, that is). I don't know how to do it in linux, though. I'm sure it's possible.
    Doing an interactive bootup seems excessively unnessecary though. I'd first recommend never turning the system off, of course, but that might be a bit stupid some times. Here's how I'd do it:

    1. Add a boot entry (duplicate an existing entry in /boot/grub/grub.conf (you're using GRUB, right?)) and add a dummy kernel command line option (one that the kernel won't recognize, e.g. "noinitnet")
    2. Add the following to your /etc/rc.d/init.d/network (just before the line that says "if [ ! -f /etc/sysconfig/network ]; then"):
    Code:
    if grep noinitnet /proc/cmdline; then
        exit 0;
    fi
    "noinitnet", should, of course, be the kernel command line option you added to grub.conf.
    It could, of course, be made even better, to initialize IP networking and just skipping some specified interfaces.
    If you can't do it yourself, maybe you could persuade me to do it for you.

  4. #4
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    thks for the input. will try this later and feedback. if it doesn't work, i'll have to persuade you then

  5. #5
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    Some updates...

    yes! it worked. however, i discovered that in RedHat (i don't know about other flavours of linux) that you can have network configuration profiles. you can find the profiles under /etc/sysconfig/networking/profiles

    and the cool thing is that RedHat also comes with a utility called "redhat-config-network-cmd" that can be used to switch profiles dynamically...

    so, what i did was create a profile called "StandaloneMode" and another called "DHCPMode". The StandaloneMode profile is configured to use a eth0-stdalone which is basically a static-ip configured logical network device and DHCPMode uses a eth0-dhcp which is basically a dhcp configured logical network device.

    Upon startup, i used the suggestion above to determine whether it is starting up in standalone mode or dhcp mode. if it is started in standalone mode, then i use the redhat-config-network-cmd utility to switch to the StandaloneMode profile. And if it is started in dhcp mode, then it will switch to the DHCPMode profile. otherwise it will use the default profile.

    Thanks for the tips Dolda and Wassy. Its people like you who make the linux community continue to grow!

    best rgds,

    steven.

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