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redhat - 9. Q.1. how do i know about my cpu type whether its i386 or i686 or i586. i use intel 865 GBF desktop board and p4 3GHz processor. ...
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  1. #1
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    i386 or i686.........2 boot options...why


    redhat - 9.

    Q.1. how do i know about my cpu type whether its i386 or i686 or i586. i use intel 865 GBF desktop board and p4 3GHz processor. Is there any command on linux to know this ??? actually the rpm which i download from internet r very specific to i386 or i686. is there any GUi tool where it will be displayed whether its a i386 or i686. can i install an rpm meant for i386 on an i686 system ?? suppose i have i686. can i download the iso image of fedora meant for i386 ? can anyone guide ???

    Q.2. At booting , the following message appears.
    GRUB version 0.93 (639k lower/1030335k upper memory)

    Redhat linux (2.4.20-8smp)
    Redhat linux-up (2.4.20- 8 )


    why above 2 options r coming ??? earlier only one option use to appear. This time when i installed, 2 options r appearing . I have installed redhat 9. is there any difference between these 2 ?


    thanx

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    your P4 will run either i386 or i586 or i686. The i686 has some clever stuff in it to make full use of the P4's ability.

    the two options at boot are for a single processor and a dual processor PC (the smp is the dual).

    If you want to really get every last ounce of power out of your PC, then have a look at Gentoo distribution, as you build the Linux to exactly suit your machine.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  3. #3
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    Ans. 1 : use uname .
    Code:
    $ uname -a
    Output will be something like this :
    Linux cpusrv-ibm-4.cse.iitkgp.ernet.in 2.4.8-26mdkenterprise #1 SMP Sun Sep 23 16:36:00 CEST 2001 i686 unknown

    Hope you've noticed that the i686, basically AFAIK, all present day cpus are of i686 architecture, it was the original Pentium 1 which was i586. However in present day terminolgy i386 is supposed to support all of the i486, i586 and i686 architectures.

    i386 = Intel 386 and above
    i486 = Intel 486 and above
    i586 = Pentium and above
    i686 = Pentium 2, Pentium 2 Celeron, and above

    YES, you can install i386 rpms on an i686. Basically, the thumbrule is first look for the rpm for your architecture, which in this case is i686, if you DONT get i686 specific rpms, then go for i386 RPMs. The i386 RPMs generally have support for i486, i586 and i686 combined. And most softwares which do not depend heavily on architecture go for the universal i386 RPM packaging.
    NOTE : an i486/i586 should NOT be installed on an i686, and vice-versa.
    ONLY i386 has a universal support.

    Ans. 2 : Both your mobo and processor support Hyperthreading which is actually a technology to virtually multiply processor. So when you installed RH9, it "saw" more than 1 processor, and accordingly gave the additional SMP option.
    SMP => Serial Multiple Processor.

    For more details on hyperthreading , I recommend a bit of googling.

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  5. #4
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    Yes you can download iso for i386. I don't know if there is a gui tool for this but you can make a simple C program that checks this:

    Code:
    #include <sys/sysinfo.h>
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>
    #include <sys/utsname.h>
    
    int main&#40;&#41; &#123;
    
      struct sysinfo sys_info;
      struct utsname name;
    
      if&#40;sysinfo&#40;&sys_info&#41; != 0&#41;
        perror&#40;"sysinfo"&#41;;
    
    uname&#40;&name&#41;;
      printf&#40;"\nSystem&#58; %s - %s\t   Hardwer&#58; %s\t\n", name.sysname, name.release, name.machine
    &#41;;
    
    return 0;
    &#125;
    You can extend this and make a program that prints everything about memory, swap, number of processes... I did that.
    Linux registered user #358842
    Human knowledge belongs to the world.

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    thanx

    thanx to all of u . my concepts r clear now.

  7. #6
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    while 'uname' will provide the architecture type, 'arch' is specifically for this purpose
    Code:
    bash-2.05b$ arch
    i686

  8. #7
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    hi Krendoshazin, your reply was indeed the real one i needed. anyway, if i use
    # uname -p
    it is i686.
    # uname -i
    it is i386.
    # arch
    it is i686.



    why the difference ??

  9. #8
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    they're two different options
    -p, --processor
    print the processor type

    -i, --hardware-platform
    print the hardware platform
    bash-2.05b$ uname -a
    Linux , excaliber , 2.4.26 , #6 Mon Jun 14 19:07:27 PDT 2004 , i686 , unknown , unknown , GNU/Linux
    kernel name, node name, kernel release, kernel version, machine hardware name, processor type, hardware platform, operating system

    btw processor type and hardware platform might be the other way around, i can't tell with them both as 'unknown'. apparently 'uname' is a system call in its own right, so it gets its info directly from strings compiled into the kernel

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