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I just installed VectorLinux 5.0.1 SOHO and am really enjoying my experience with it so far. I think I found 'my' distro. I noticed the version of Firefox that came ...
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  1. #1
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    How Do I Install FireFox 1.04? -VectorLinux 5.0.1 SOHO


    I just installed VectorLinux 5.0.1 SOHO and am really enjoying my experience with it so far. I think I found 'my' distro.

    I noticed the version of Firefox that came with it was now outdated though. I'm an IT-Admin winblows user, and the old FF version was one of the first things I noticed.

    Despite being an WinOS poweruser, I'm a fairly noobish to Linux. Never "installed/uninstalled" apps in Linux before, and basically the little I know is from a PCStats article <here>. (actually, it doesn't seem like you actually install/uninstall apps in Linux, just add or delete files i.e. no windows-like registry type stuff worry about besides making sure you have all the appropriate libraries (correct? do I have this right?))


    I did a file search for "mozilla" and found:

    Code:
    usr/lib/mozilla/
    usr/X11R6/bin/mozilla pointing to&#58; ../lib/firefox/firefox
    A search for "firefox" found:

    Code:
    home/drcr/.mozilla/firefox/
    root/.mozilla/firefox/
    usr/X11R6/lib/firefox/
    usr/X11R6/bin/firefox pointing to&#58; ../lib/firefox/firefox
    usr/X11R6/lib/firefox/firefox script
    I assume usr/X11R6/bin/mozilla and usr/X11R6/bin/firefox are some sort of "shortcut"? What are they used for? What is the correct Linux term if it does indeed function like a "shortcut" in WinOSes?


    Should I delete all of those files except maybe
    home/drcr/.mozilla/firefox/
    root/.mozilla/firefox/

    which are just "profiles" ?


    Thanks! I'll look into the correct way of installing FF (both from the tar.gz from their site, and rpm (or whatever VL uses)) later after I get this uninstallation part nailed down.

    Thanks again,
    DrCR

    ___________

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    Here's a link to a topic at the vector forums on installing stuff in vector:
    http://vectorlinux.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5103
    Stumbling around the 'net:
    www.cloudyuseful.com

  3. #3
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    Heh.. Already responded to his thread in the VL forum, but here goes....

    Code:
    tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz
    Go to the directory that the files were unpacked to.

    Run the installer. Make sure Firefox is NOT running when you do this, and input /usr/X11R6/lib/firefox for the installation location. You may need to remove firefox-installer from that line as well.

    At that point, Firefox will remove the old program and install the new.

    You may have an issue with plugins. If so, you can delete the firefox directory under home/drcr/.mozilla (make a backup of your bookmark.html file first). Fire up Firefox and it will recreate the firefox directory. Copy your bookmark.html file back over and you should be good to go.
    Registered Linux user #384279
    Vector Linux SOHO 7

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired1af
    You may need to remove firefox-installer from that line as well.
    Awesome, thanks retired1af! You lost me on that sentence though lol. What do you mean by that? Is it something that shows up when I run the installer?

    Already familiar with the bookmark.html file from my winblows based FF experience, so that's fine. What is the bookmark.bak file for, you know? I keep making a copy of it when I back up my WinOS partition, but I'm not sure if it is really necessary.

    Are usr/X11R6/bin/mozilla and usr/X11R6/bin/firefox some sort of "shortcut"? What are they used for? What is the correct Linux term if it does indeed function like a "shortcut" in WinOSes?

    Thanks!

  5. #5
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    They're probably symbolic links, or symlinks for short. A symlink simply links to a file or directory. You create one with
    Code:
    ln -s TARGET &#91;LINK_NAME&#93;
    or
    ln -s TARGET DIRECTORY
    Note that windoewz filesystems like NTFS and vfat don't support symlinks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by a thing
    They're probably symbolic links, or symlinks for short. A symlink simply links to a file or directory. You create one with
    Code:
    ln -s TARGET &#91;LINK_NAME&#93;
    or
    ln -s TARGET DIRECTORY
    Note that windoewz filesystems like NTFS and vfat don't support symlinks.
    Ah, OK. So how does it differ from a 'shortcut'? And why have them outside of user convience (i.e. desktop, 'start menu', etc)?

    A good read at wikipedia here, but I still fail to see the difference between it and a shortcut and the overall necessity of such 'shortcuts'.

    Thanks

  7. #7
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    Granny Geek answered your question in the VL forums.
    Registered Linux user #384279
    Vector Linux SOHO 7

  8. #8
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    Right, just now saw it lol. Was actually about to post his comment and my response here. Didn't count on the overlap in user base between here and the VL forums.

    Here's a link to the post in the VL forums for those interested and/or posterity:
    http://www.vectorlinux.com/forum/post-32985.html#32985

    DrCR

    ________

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